Author

Scott Lewis

Posts
August 25, 2010

Learning Disabilities and Indiana Social Security Disability Benefits

Indiana residents often find themselves with their disability claim denied when they suffer from a learning disability. If you have a learning disability or a combination of disabilities that prevent you from working, you may be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. If you have been turned down for Social Security disability benefits and believe you are entitled to these benefits, do not give up. Many disability claims are turned down in the early stages of a disability claim. Claims involving learning disabilities may be won with appropriate medical and intellectual functioning documentation. Some documentation that may help win a Social Security claim can include school records indicating failing grades, teacher’s notes and progress reports that show inferior work, poor standardized testing scores from academic institutions, and low IQ scores. Other factors that may be taken into account could include the inability to read, write, and understand & follow simple instructions. While many learning disability claims involve children attempting to receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, adults may also be disabled from a learning disability or combination of disabilities. Indiana claimants may find some of these claims difficult to win without appropriate medical or academic documentation. Indiana claimant’s testimony at an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ)hearing may help sway the chance of winning in their favor if they can convince the judge their learning disability is severe enough to prevent them from obtaining full time employment. Many individuals with learning disabilities may need a job coach to function in the work place and many times with this finding they may win their Social Security disability claim.

Filed under: Qualifying Disabilities and Impairments || Tagged under:
0 comments || Author:

August 19, 2010

Indiana Social Security Disability Appeals Process Waiting Period

Indianapolis Social Security Disability Attorney Scott D. Lewis represents Indiana Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits claimants with their pending claims. Initial disability claims may be filed at a local Social Security Administration (SSA) office, by calling the SSA’s toll free phone number, or visiting the SSA’s website.  Although it may be discouraging to claimants to hear that some sources report 70% of all claims are denied at the initial application, Scott Lewis encourages his clients to continue to fight for their disability benefits by appealing the SSA’s decision to deny their claim. Statistically, continuing the appeals process may be beneficial to 70-80% of all claims that were initially denied. What’s the downfall to appealing your claim?  Disability Lawyer Scott Lewis would say that it is the time period the Indiana SSDI and SSI claimants have to wait in order to get a hearing in front of an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ).  Attorney Lewis advises all of his claimants to “not give up” and continue with the disability appeals process.  Because of the “backlog” of disability cases in the state of Indiana, Indianapolis Social Security disability claimants may find themselves waiting two years before they are in front of an ALJ for their disability hearing. What does a client do when they are waiting for a hearing in front of an ALJ?  Continue to be patient, keep your Social Security Lawyer informed, continue to visit with your doctors, and do not become discouraged.  As frustrating as it may be, when Attorney Scott Lewis wins his clients claims, often his clients will get a lump sum payment from the SSA for the time that they have waited to get a disability hearing.  Even though the wait may be long, many Indiana Social Security disability claimants find that they have no choice … Continued

Filed under: Appeals Process || Tagged under:
0 comments || Author:

August 16, 2010

Heart Problems and Indiana Social Security Disability Benefits

Nearly six (6) million of Americans suffer from heart failure every year. Many of these individuals are Indiana residents that may qualify for Social Security disability benefits. The Social Security Administration (SSA) has a set of qualifying disability listings covering the various types of heart impairments referred to in the listing of impairments section 4.1 through 4.12. This listing of impairments discusses a set criteria of requirements that the claimant must meet to be granted monthly Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Benefits. Although there are other ways to receive Social Security disability benefits, some of the impairments listed under this listing are: chronic heart failure,  ischemic heart disease, recurrent arrhythmias,  symptomatic congenital heart disease,  heart transplant, aneurysm of aorta or major branches, and chronic venous insufficiency. For more information on these impairments and their requirements by SSA, please visit www.ssa.gov.  Due to the complexity of the medical terminology and rules in a disability claim for cardiovascular disease, you may want to consider the help of a Social Security Disability Attorney to assist you with your disability claim. Indianapolis Social Security Disability Attorney Scott D. Lewis and his staff may help assist you in submitting all the relevant medical evidence to support your disability claim, as well as attempt to retrieve the opinion evidence from your doctors. Medical evidence may be very beneficial in supporting your SSDI or SSI claim. It is imperative that you prove to the SSA how your heart disease impacts your ability to work.  Some of the necessary evidence for your claim can include: reports of the history of your illness from your doctor, physical examinations, laboratory studies, and your prescribed treatment. Scott D. Lewis is an Indiana Attorney that has experience in Social Security disability claims. In his years of experience, Scott D. Lewis has helped many Indiana disability claimants with their disability appeals.

Filed under: Qualifying Disabilities and Impairments || Tagged under:
0 comments || Author:

August 11, 2010

Indiana Residents Seeking Social Security Disability Benefits for Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a condition that is not fully understood by doctors today. Because of this, some Administrative Law Judges do not think fibromyalgia holds much weight as a debilitating condition. There is a far better chance that you may receive Social Security Disability benefits if your fibromyalgia is paired with another condition such as arthritis or another muscle or skeletal condition. Some symptoms of fibromyalgia include widespread pain, muscle spasms, fatigue, and/or sleep disturbances. The cause for fibromyalgia is not known for sure, but there are some hypotheses including genetics, stress, and a dopamine dysfunction. Because of the lack of knowledge as to what causes fibromyalgia, the Social Security Administration may overlook a case dealing strictly with fibromyalgia. One of the ways to receive Social Security Disability benefits for fibromyalgia, may be that the claimant must show that his/her condition is severe enough to limit their ability to perform simple work operations at most jobs. Some examples of restrictions may be walking, standing, carrying, speaking, and/or completing simple instructions from memory. Scott D. Lewis, Attorney at Law, has worked with claimants suffering from fibromyalgia. In his experience with Social Security Disability law, it may be necessary to show that an Indiana claimant suffers from severe widespread pain for at least three months in 11 of the 18 tender points as established by the College of Rheumatology and the Centers for Disease Control along with other factors. Some Administrative Law Judges may also find an Indiana disability claimant disabled if they can show that fibromyalgia restricts their activities of daily living in such a way that it is obvious that their impairment is severe.

Filed under: Qualifying Disabilities and Impairments || Tagged under:
0 comments || Author:

August 10, 2010

Social Security Disability Benefits for Indiana Children With ADHD and ADD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a condition in which attention problems exist simultaneously with hyperactivity. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is in the Child Listings Section (Part B) of the Listing of Impairments for the Social Security Administration. >Section 112.11 is the specific section for ADHD. It states that two main requirements must be satisfied. The first is that medical findings must document all three of the following: 1) Marked inattention 2) Marked impulsiveness 3) Marked hyperactivity The second is that for children ages 1 to 3 they must meet one of the age appropriate criteria in paragraph B1 of section 112.02. Also for children ages 3 to 18 they must meet two of the age appropriate criteria in paragraph B2 of section section 112.02 of the Child Listings Section (Part B) of the Listing of Impairments. Some symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder may include being easily distracted, forgetting things, not listening when spoken to, and/or becoming easily confused. There are three main known causes of ADHD. The first one is genetics. Studies have indicated that genetics are a factor in 75% of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder cases. The second cause is Environmental. It has been suggested that about 9% to 20% of ADHD cases can be traced back to alcohol and tobacco abuse during pregnancy. The third cause for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is Social. The World Health Organization says that ADHD might be caused by family dysfunction or inadequate education services. Attorney Scott D. Lewis has dealt with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) clients in his experience in Social Security Disability law. ADHD may affect a child or adult’s performance at work or school. ADHD may prevent an individual from focusing on the task at hand, and they may struggle getting everyday tasks accomplished. Indiana Attorney Scott … Continued

Filed under: Qualifying Disabilities and Impairments || Tagged under:
0 comments || Author:

August 4, 2010

Indiana Disability Claimants and Back Problems

About 31 million Americans experience back pain at any given time in the United States. Many of these people are Indiana residents that may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits. Back impairments are listed under section 1.04 in the Social Security’s Listing of Impairments. This section is titled “Disorders of The Spine”. Back impairments may also be any back pain in general. Back impairments may include pain when you are sitting, standing, or walking. Back pain may come from an injury, an accident, or a medical condition like scoliosis. Some other specific disorders that are listed under section 1.04 are herniated nucleus pulpous, spinal stenosis, or degenerative disc disease. Back pain is one of the most common claims that Social Security Judges see. Because of this, claimants must show that they have more than mild to moderate discomfort that most people experience. Claimants must show that their pain is severe and debilitating to the point were work is not possible. Some of the factors that judges want to see may include objective evidence such as MRI reports, the disability claimant has exhausted all efforts to treat the problem, and a long work history may be beneficial. Attorney Scott D. Lewis has many Indiana Disability clients that suffer from extreme back pain. Severe back pain may limit an individuals ability to preform simple activities of daily living. Such as bathing and grooming, household chores, driving, and even interacting with your family in a normal fashion. If you find that your back pain is severely interfering with your life, you may find it necessary to contact a Social Security Disability Lawyer.

Filed under: Qualifying Disabilities and Impairments
0 comments || Author:

July 23, 2010

Indiana Residents Claiming Disability Benefits for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Many Indiana residents living with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is an injury caused by repetitive movements that strain the median nerve of the carpal tunnel area of the wrist. This results in tissue enlargement that pinches the median nerve running through your hand. Symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome may include sensations of burning or tingling, loss of grip strength or dexterity, locking of joints, swelling, inflammation, or pain. Currently the Social Security Administration has no entry in the Listing of Impairments for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. This is why most people do not know that they may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome does not have a entry in the listing of impairments because it is not considered one of the more common disabilities. A likely reason for this is because most people with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can perform other aspects of their job. Typing may be hard for someone living with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome but answering the phone or going to meetings may not require repetitive use of the hands resulting in pain. While Carpal Tunnel Syndrome may not be recognized in the listing of impairments, it can be considered a disabling condition by the Social Security Administration. An Administrative Law Judge may find Carpal Tunnel Syndrome prevents you from returning to past employment, and may find that due to your condition there are no jobs in the economy in significant numbers you can preform. Indiana Residents that have questions as to if their condition is severe enough to receive benefits may want to contact a Social Security Disability Attorney.

Filed under: Qualifying Disabilities and Impairments
0 comments || Author:

July 21, 2010

How do Indiana Residents Apply for Social Security Disability Benefits Online

Many Indiana residents wonder if it is possible to apply for Social Security Disability benefits online. It is actually a fairly easy process with only four main steps that can be followed on the Social Security Administration website. The first thing to do is log on to the Social Security Administration website at http://www.ssa.gov. Next, click on the Disability Benefits link in the middle of the page. This brings you to a page that is titled “Apply Online for Disability Benefits”. At the bottom of this page the four main steps are outlined for you. The first step is to review the disability checklist. This checklist consists of all the information that you need to complete the Disability Application and the Disability Report. If you click the link at this step, it will take you to the Adult Disability Checklist. On this page there is a printable version of the list. The second step is to fill out the application itself. If you click on the link in the second step it takes you to a page with three important sections. The first one is “using this application”. This link will take you to the instructions for the Social Security Disability benefits application. The second section is the bullet list of links to help with other questions. The third section is the last section on the page that is the start of the application process for Social Security Disability benefits. The third step in applying for Social Security Disability benefits online is to complete the Disability Report. This step is very similar to the second step because of the three main components on the Adult Disability Report page. The first part is instructions on how to fill out the form, the second part is links for other questions or problems, … Continued

Filed under: Indiana Social Security Disability Attorney, Social Security Disability Benefits
0 comments || Author:

July 13, 2010

Why Does The Social Security Administration Care About My Past Employment?

A common question that many Indiana disability applicants have may be: why does the Social Security Administration care about my work history? Sometimes at an Administrative Law Judge hearing in order to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, the judge and the job expert must find that you cannot return to any past work along with meeting other standards. It is important that in describing your past work history that you are very thorough. The more information that you give to your attorney, the judge, and the court in general, may increase your chances at winning your social security disability claim. When the court uses the phrase “past work” they are talking about any job that you have held for at least three months in the past 15 years. Any job older than the 15 year period is irrelevant because the person is likely to have lost the skill for the job or the technology they used is now outdated. After looking at your current abilities and disabilities the court will determine a RFC (residual functional capacity). This is a rating on how much work and what kind of work you can do. You may not be able to work construction, but a retail job may not be out of the question. This is why it is important to give an accurate past work history. The more details you give, the better the court can compare your prior skills to your current RFC. Social Security Disability Attorney Scott D. Lewis often finds Indiana disability claimants have a difficult time remembering past work details. It may be helpful if Indiana Social Security Disability claimants make notes prior to the hearing in an Indiana courtroom to help them adequately describe prior employment.

Filed under: Evaluation Process
0 comments || Author:

July 13, 2010

Indiana Residents Seeking Disability Benefits for Pancreatic Cancer

It is estimated that by the end of the year 2010 a little over 43,000 people will have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in the United States. Some of these people are Indiana residents wondering if they can receive social security disability benefits for this condition. Pancreatic cancer is in section 13.20 in the listing of impairments under malignant neoplastic diseases. As defined by The Mayo Clinic, Pancreatic Cancer is cancer of the organ that lies directly under your stomach. The pancreas releases enzymes that help digest food and hormones for your metabolism. Some symptoms of pancreatic cancer may include pain in your upper abdomen, jaundice, loss of appetite, weight loss, and clinical depression. No one knows for sure what causes pancreatic cancer but there may be some risk factors. These may include age over 60 years old, smoking, obesity, and African-American ethnicity. There are many different tests that a doctor may perform to determine if someone has pancreatic cancer. The most common is a biopsy, while an x-ray or a CT scan might also be used. Indiana residents attempting to receive social security disability benefits from the social security administration may be interested in knowing the different stages of pancreatic cancer. There are four main stages of pancreatic cancer. Stage one is cancer in the pancreas only. Stage two is after the cancer has spread to nearby tissue and possibly the lymph nodes. Stage three is when the cancer has spread to the major surrounding blood vessels and the lymph nodes. Stage four is cancer that has spread to all surrounding organs and most of the abdomen. There are two main treatments for pancreatic cancer. The first is surgery. This is only possible if the cancer is in its early phases. This procedure involves removing the pancreatic head if … Continued

Filed under: Qualifying Disabilities and Impairments
0 comments || Author: