May 4, 2011

Can My Kids Get Social Security Disability Benefits?

You may be surprised how often Indianapolis Social Security lawyer Scott Lewis gets asked the above question.  The truth is, there are specific guidelines set forth by the Social Security Administration (SSA) just for children.  The Social Security Administration does provide payments through the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program for disabled children.

On many occasions, Indiana Social Security disability attorney Scott Lewis finds himself discussing the “ins and outs” of the SSI program as it pertains to children with his potential and current clients.  One of the first hurdles many families may encounter when trying to obtain Indiana Social security disability benefits for their child is the question of income and resources.  If the child or a certain family member’s income and resources are above the limit set forth by the SSA, it may not matter how disabled the child is.  The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program is what may be termed a “needs” based program.  In other words, if the SSA determines you don’t need it, you don’t get it.  So what happens if your child and family income and resources are below the limit?  At that point, the Social Security Administration will determine if your child has a qualifying disabling condition.

When it comes to a child, what does the Social Security Administration consider a disabling condition?  Indiana residents may want to take a look at Social Security’s “Listing of Impairments.”  This is a guideline assembled to outline certain disabling conditions.  It should be noted there is a section that is focused solely on child disabilities.  If your child does not precisely meet one of these listings there are still other ways to win your Indiana Social Security disability appeal.

In cases involving children, the Social Security Administration will look at several domains in determining if a child is disabled due to a mental or physical impairment and these include:

  • Acquiring and Using Information
  • Interacting and Relating with Others
  • Moving About and Manipulating Objects
  • Caring For Yourself
  • and Health and Physical Well Being

Some Indiana disability lawyers steer clear of childhood disability claims.  This could be due to various reasons, but Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott Lewis decides what cases he will represent, whether child or adult, on a case by case basis.  After talking with potential clients, Mr. Lewis determines if the disability is severe enough, among other factors, and then informs a potential client as to whether he believes it is a Social Security disability claim that may have a good chance of being found favorable.

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