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April 26, 2017

Breathing Problems and Social Security Disability

Many of my clients having breathing problems as either their sole issue or as just another problem among the many they experience. Breathing problems such as Emphysema, Asthma, COPD, or any other impairment can make it extremely difficult to work.  Sometimes it is very apparent just by talking to an individual, while other times it is more obvious when they are exerting themselves.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) does consider breathing problems when determining a disabling condition.  It may be wise for you to file a Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim if you find this or any other condition prevents you from working. My clients often complain that their breathing problems cause many symptoms including but not limited to: Shortness of Breath Fatigue Chest pain Constant coughing Wheezing Chronic Respiratory Infections Unfortunately, many lung problems can be permanent in nature. As with all disabling conditions, the SSA will usually need medical documentation to prove your disabling condition.  A Pulmonary Function Test may help to persuade the SSA your condition is severe enough to receive disability payments.  The Social Security Administration examines pulmonary disorders under the provisions in its Listing of Impairments.  Listing 3.00 Respiratory Disorders outlines the information the SSA uses to determine if a person meets or equals this disabling condition. Receiving the correct type of treatment can be the key to a successful outcome in a Social Security disability appeal. A qualified pulmonologist may be able to provide the medical documentation needed for the SSA to grant your claim.  It is important to remember to let the SSA know you have issues with your breathing, even though it may not be your primary reason for filing a disability claim.  The SSA can consider all of your impairments in combination when deciding if … Continued

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March 30, 2017

How Important Are My Employees To You?

Years of practicing Social Security Disability law have taught me the importance of having an exceptional office staff. Good Social Security help can be hard to find.  From answering initial client concerns to the final day in court, I find my staff to be diligent and caring.  My current staff greatly exceeds my expectations on a daily basis.   My receptionist, Lisa, is one-of-a-kind. She takes the time to listen to our clients.  Even after receiving many phone calls, she takes the initiative to talk with me about her concerns regarding our clients.  She continually asks questions to learn more about the Social Security process and expand her knowledge.  Many of my clients specifically ask for Lisa when they call, knowing she will remember them and address their needs.  The face of my office is at the reception desk, and I am fortunate Lisa is there to greet my clients.   My right hand man is Attorney Robert Tyree. I can trust Rob with every aspect of representing clients and running day-to-day operations of the business.  Rob is quick to answer questions and offer solid legal advice. His professionalism and steady hand cannot be overstated.  In my line of work, there is no task or job I would not trust Rob to handle.   Attorney Nick Moskalick heads up brief writing and formulating legal arguments for hearings. Nick also has daily interaction with new and existing clients, answering their questions and concerns.  Nick has been a welcome addition to the office, constantly striving to make each case stronger.  Nick discusses each case with me and informs me of positives and negatives that may impact a Social Security appeal.   The medical records section is driven by Attorney Jake Jones. Obtaining medical records to support your disability claim is an essential … Continued

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February 23, 2017

Terminal Illness or TERI cases and Social Security Disability

One of the unfortunate realities of my job is that some of my clients are diagnosed as terminal. While being diagnosed with a terminal illness may seem like an obvious favorable decision for the Social Security Administration (SSA) to make, that may not always be the case. Even with this diagnosis the SSA may need more information and can be slow in making a determination.  Hopefully your medical provider, family, and Social Security attorney or representative can gather the information to make it easier for the SSA to make the right decision quickly.   The Social Security Administration avoids the words “terminal illness” and instead calls these cases TERI cases. The SSA defines a TERI case as “a medical condition that is untreatable and expected to result in death.”  Once this type of designation exists, the SSA attempts to expedite the case in the early and later stages of processing.  The SSA has guidelines for identifying these cases and processing them in a particular way.   Getting a medical source statement from your treating physician can be very important. Not only a statement saying the individual is terminal, but also supporting medical evidence establishing a clear diagnosis.  Objective testing and progress notes should be submitted to the SSA to show the severity of the condition.  Many physicians are hesitant to make such statements until all medical avenues have been exhausted.  If you find yourself in this situation it may be in your best interest to let your physician know you are dealing with the Social Security Administration.   If you or a family member finds themselves in this situation, I urge you to contact the SSA as soon as possible to start this process. Qualified Social Security disability attorneys and representatives can also provide guidance on filling out paperwork and … Continued

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January 31, 2017

Social Security Disability and the Durational Requirement

As a Social Security Disability Attorney, I see the Social Security Administration (SSA) turn people down for a variety of reasons. One of the common ways you may be turned down for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and/or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is because the SSA states you do not meet its Durational Requirement.  This is a fairly easy way for them to turn down your claim, but you can appeal this decision and many times find yourself with a favorable outcome in the long run.   What is the “Durational Requirement”? The language the SSA uses requires that you must have an impairment lasting or expected to last at least 12 months.  As you can tell, this can be a pretty subjective standard.  The SSA makes this determination on the current medical records they have on hand.  Unfortunately, your medical record may be incomplete when they make this determination.  You can appeal this decision and if you believe you are unable to work and will continue to be unable to work it is most likely in your best interest to file a Request for Reconsideration or Request for Hearing to move your case along.  You have approximately 60 days to file these appeals and it is very important to do so in a timely manner so you do not have to file another initial application.   It is also important to note your impairment must prevent you from performing Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) for at least 12 months in a row. What this essentially means is that you cannot receive disability benefits when your wages are over SGA.  This is a monetary amount establishing a cap you cannot go over.  Many of my clients have difficulty grasping this concept when they are holding down a full time job while … Continued

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November 18, 2016

Do You Know Why You Are Disabled?

That seems like a strange question doesn’t it? My clients tell me they are disabled, but many have a hard time saying it in a way the Social Security Administration (SSA) understands. Many people have Social Security disability questions.  There can be many reasons why it is hard to explain your inability to work.  You may have a rare condition the SSA is not very familiar with; you may have a combination of impairments that, all added together, make you unable to work; you may have to argue you meet special rules the SSA recognizes; or you may just simply be unable to work a full time job.  Trust me, claiming you are disabled to the SSA can be confusing and difficult, or it can be as easy as they want to make it for you.  That’s why knowing what to tell them can possibly create a make or break situation.   In my experience, you need to be careful how you phrase things to the Social Security Administration. First of all, being disabled is not a joke.  Going to physical and mental examinations the SSA sends you to and taking it lightly may result in that particular examiner noting your attitude to the SSA.  All the way through the process, you need to express accurately to the SSA what you are experiencing.   Fill out the forms the SSA gives you truthfully and in their entirety. Some claims can be processed favorably without much human interaction by giving the SSA ALL of the information they request.  Be proactive in your claim, especially at the initial level, to ensure the SSA gets all pertinent information.  Unfortunately, after initial denials, while waiting for a hearing, your claim may not be looked at again until you find yourself in front of an Administrative Law … Continued

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July 7, 2016

Do I have a good Social Security disability case?

I hear this question probably more than any other question from my clients.  When I was in law school, one of my professors told me, “The facts always matter,” and a Social Security disability case is no exception.  It’s also important to know how Social Security applies its rules to the facts of your case when you are trying to show that you are unable to work.  While there are many variables that affect your chances of winning your claim, I have found that some factors are more important than the others. Medical treatment: One of the first things I ask potential clients is whether or not they are seeing doctors.  In order to find that you are disabled, Social Security must be able to find that you have a medically determinable impairment that affects your ability to work.   You must also have medical records that support the statements you make about how badly your symptoms affect you.  You can’t assume that the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) at your hearing will know that you are a trustworthy person who doesn’t exaggerate.  Even if the ALJ does find that you are a credible person, he or she will still want to see objective testing (like x-rays or MRIs) and/or progress notes from your physician that back up your testimony.  The ALJ will want proof that you are being treated by doctors who specialize in your type of impairments – for example, that you are seeing an orthopedic doctor if you have degenerative disc disease, a rheumatologist if you have fibromyalgia, a psychiatrist if you have bipolar disorder, or a neurologist if you have migraine headaches.  If your doctor is willing to provide a written statement about your work-related limitations, it can also improve your chances of a favorable outcome. Age, education, and work experience: … Continued

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April 11, 2016

What are ADLs, and why does Social Security care so much if I go on vacation or keep my house clean?

Many of my clients do not understand why the Social Security Administration (SSA) is so interested in their day-to-day activities.  It might help to think about it this way: since you are not able to work, Social Security can’t ask you how your current symptoms affect your work activities.  Therefore, they have to look instead at what you are actually able (or unable) to do in your daily life.  Social Security refers to these things as your “Activities of Daily Living,” or ADLs. During the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) application process, Social Security sends each claimant a questionnaire called an Adult Function Report.  This form asks specific questions about how your impairments affect your ability to do what you need to do to get through a typical day.  Similarly, the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) at your hearing will ask questions about your ADLs, including your ability to: Clean your house (sweep, mop, dust, wash dishes, etc.) Shop for groceries Take care of your yard Drive a car Bathe, shower, and take care of your personal hygiene Dress yourself Do laundry Cook or prepare meals Care for children, other family members, or pets Participate in hobbies Spend time with friends Travel on vacations When you answer questions about your ADLs, it’s important to keep in mind why Social Security is asking them.  The ALJ is not trying to find out of you are a conscientious housekeeper or if you are an interesting person to hang out with.  It can be really hard – embarrassing, even – to admit that you aren’t able to take a shower or wash your dishes as often as you think you should.  It is painful for a lot of my clients to realize that it has been years since they … Continued

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January 6, 2016

Finding an Indiana Social Security Disability Lawyer for your Child

If you have had a difficult time finding an attorney to represent you in your child’s claim for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, you may not be alone.  When I speak to new clients in my Indianapolis Social Security disability law practice, they often tell me that many of the Social Security disability attorneys they had consulted simply do not take children’s cases.  Some Administrative Law Judges have told me that children’s SSI cases can be more difficult to win than adult cases.  In my experience, the chances of winning a child’s case are affected by the same factors that affect adults’ cases – we need good treatment records, statements from a treating physician supporting the claimant’s descriptions of his or her symptoms, and good preparation for the hearing.   I take great pride in helping the families of disabled children, and I believe my experience with these cases helps to ensure that my clients have the best chance possible at a favorable outcome. One of the reasons some attorneys may be reluctant to accept children’s cases is that the Social Security Administration (SSA) uses different criteria in evaluating a child’s disability that it does when it evaluates an adult’s impairments.  For example, Social Security has a separate Listing of Impairments for adults and children.  Further, the SSA evaluates children’s and adults’ functional limitations using different frameworks.  The main issue in an adult’s case is whether his or her disability is severe enough to prevent full-time work.  Obviously, since children do not work, Social Security cannot analyze a child’s functional limitations in this manner.  Instead, the SSA determines whether a child has “marked” limitations in at least two (or “extreme” limitations in at least one) of six areas of functioning Social Security calls “domains”: Acquiring and using information:  the child’s ability … Continued

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December 31, 2015

Can I Get Social Security Disability For COPD?

If your symptoms are severe enough, Social Security can find you disabled if you have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).  However, a diagnosis on its own is not enough.  In my practice, I find that COPD is disabling to my clients in two ways – either because their COPD symptoms are so severe that they are unable to work, or because their COPD symptoms combine with symptoms from other impairments to keep them from working. I am surprised at how many of my clients have breathing difficulties.  Their diagnoses range from asthma to emphysema.  My experience with clients with breathing problems is that their symptoms generally do not improve with time.  If you find you are unable to work due to COPD or any other breathing problem, it may be in your best interest to apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as soon as possible. The Social Security Administration (SSA) examines COPD in its Listing of Impairments under listing 3.02 for chronic pulmonary insufficiency.  The listings in section 3 cover many other types of respiratory impairments as well, including asthma, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, persistent pulmonary infections, and cor pulomale due to chronic pulmonary vascular hypertension.  If you have COPD or any other respiratory problem, Social Security will probably order a “pulmonary function test” to objectively determine the extent of the obstruction to your airways.  If you are already being treated by a pulmonologist, you may have already had one or more pulmonary function tests performed.  Social Security will request records from your doctor, which will include these test results as well as your doctor’s diagnoses and clinical impressions. Another way to meet the requirements of the listings in section 3 is to show that you have frequent respiratory exacerbations that require physician intervention.  If … Continued

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December 11, 2015

Is it Easy to Get Social Security Disability?

I don’t think so.  Almost every day I hear from somebody who tells me about a neighbor or relative who gets Social Security Disability payments even though there is “nothing wrong with him.”  The fact is there are guidelines and rules that must be met in every Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) case.  When people tell me stories like the one I just mentioned, my guess is they are not fully informed about the facts regarding the particular case.  Social Security processes each claim for disability very thoroughly, so to think Social Security hands out benefits like candy is just not the truth. First, individuals must meet certain rules regarding resources and whether you have worked enough to be eligible.  The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program considers various factors regarding financial resources and income to determine eligibility.  The Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program is available to workers who have worked long enough to earn eligibility for benefits.  Unfortunately, some individuals do not qualify for either program; one example is a parent who has taken several years off of work to care for young children but has a spouse who works full time.  The best way to determine whether you qualify is to apply for both programs and let the SSA determine your eligibility. Second, medical records are generally necessary to prove a case and receive benefits.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes certain impairments as disabling.  Simply saying you have something wrong with you is usually not enough if you cannot provide medical evidence to back you up.  While the SSA will send you to a consultative medical examination, in my experience the results of these examinations are not given a great amount of weight by the disability reviewers or by Administrative Law Judges … Continued

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