here
May 17, 2011

Meniere’s Disease and Some Views from Indiana Social Security Attorney Scott Lewis

Meniere’s disease is an ear disorder that may result in your inability to hold down a job and have a huge impact on your activities of daily living.  Indiana disability lawyer Scott Lewis has represented Indiana disability claimants with Meniere’s and understands how difficult this disease can make everyday life.  If you suffer from Meniere’s disease and you are unable to work because of symptoms that affect you in a severe manner, it may be time to file for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. While the symptoms of Meniere’s disease may vary, they may include: Episodes of dizziness and vertigo.  These episodes may result in nausea and may elevate the risk of falls.  The intensity and duration of these “attacks” may vary from individual to individual. Tinnitus or ringing in the ears can also be a symptom of Meniere’s disease.  While ringing in the ears is a common complaint, individuals with Meniere’s may also complain of other distracting sounds.  The ability to concentrate on work like activity while experiencing these distracting sounds can be greatly affected. A general loss of hearing. Some individuals with Meniere’s disease report hearing loss to varying degrees. One can only imagine with the above symptoms how difficult it can be to function in a work like activity or simply to carry out daily activities.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) does recognize Meniere’s disease in its “Listing of Impairments” under Listing 2.07 Disturbance of Labyrinthine-vestibular Function.  It is important for Indiana residents suffering from Meniere’s disease to examine this listing to determine if they meet or equal the criteria needed for disability.  Indianapolis disability attorney Scott Lewis often crafts questionnaires and submits them to physicians with the hope that they will complete them to help support a claim of disability … Continued

Filed under: News || Tagged under:
0 comments || Author:

December 14, 2010

2011 Cost-of-Living Adjustments (COLA) for Social Security Disability Benefits Recipients

As with all Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit recipients, Indiana disability benefits recipients are not going to see an increase in their monthly disability payment in 2011. On October 15th, 2010, the Social Security Administration (SSA) announced that there would be no Cost-of-Living Adjustments (COLA) for 2011. This is the second year in a row that there was not an increase to SSDI, SSI or Social Security retirement benefit payments.  Over 50 million Americans receive some form of Social Security benefit. What are Cost-of-Living Adjustments (COLA)? COLA is an automatic adjustment to the SSDI or SSI recipient’s monthly benefits that may occur each year. The COLA increase is based on the percentage increase from year to year of the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Worker (CPI-W) during the third quarter of the year.  This percentage increase of COLA is strictly based on the CPI-W increase so, when there is not an increase in the CPI-W then there is no increase in COLA.  CPI-W increases are determined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the Department of Labor.  The purpose of the COLA increase is so the purchasing power of SSDI or SSI benefits keep in pace with consumer prices and that benefits are not eroded by inflation. Why isn’t there a COLA increase in 2011?  As in 2010, because there was no increase in the CPI-W from the third quarter of the previous year to the third quarter of the current year. Therefore, SSDI and SSI payments will remain the same in 2011.  In the last two years, overall inflation has been low, largely because of the economic downturn.  It has been predicted by the Congressional Budget Office that inflation will remain low for the next several years.  As a result, this may mean that Social Security recipients may not see a COLA increase for … Continued

Filed under: News, Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), Supplemental Security Income (SSI) || Tagged under:
0 comments || Author: