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April 18, 2019

Sciatica and Social Security Disability

Sciatica and Social Security Disability. Sciatica can generally be described as radiation of pain from your lower back into your hip, buttocks, and/or lower extremities.  This can result from the sciatic nerve being pinched or compressed.  It is often caused by the degeneration of an intervertebral disc.  The pain from sciatica can vary greatly from a minor pain to a burning sensation or the feeling of an electrical shock. If you experience sciatica, testing such as X-rays, CT scans, and MRI’s can demonstrate the cause of your sciatic pain.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) relies on these types of objective tests to establish a disabling condition.  Most medical providers can order objective testing to help determine the cause of your symptoms.  An abundance of medical treatment is needed to prove to the SSA how severe your disabling condition is.  Common treatment types can include pain management, injections, or physical therapy.  Without these types of medical documentation, it can be hard to support your allegations of pain; relying on the SSA to send you to one of their exams is usually not enough.  It is important for you to tell your medical providers how you experience sciatic pain and the limitations it causes you. Many of my clients with back impairments experience negative effects on their daily lives.  They describe pain with standing, walking, and sitting. These limitations can impact a person’s ability to do many job tasks.  In addition to preventing a worker’s postural movements like reaching or bending, pain can make it hard to concentrate or complete your duties.  Some of my clients even require an assistive device like a cane or walker in order to relieve their pain while they stand or walk.  This can cause difficulty in jobs that require an employee to stand and walk around … Continued

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March 4, 2019

If I Have Crohn’s Disease Can I Get Social Security Disability Benefits?

In my experience, Crohn’s disease can be a very disabling condition and may qualify you for either Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  The symptoms from Crohn’s disease can be painful, uncomfortable, and can consume most of the person’s day just trying to complete simple tasks.  Very few employers will tolerate an employee that spends much of the day off task and consistently in the nearest restroom.  The Social Security Administration recognizes this, and many times these exact issues are addressed at an Administrative Law Judge hearing. My clients generally describe the similar symptoms, and these can include, but are not limited to: Diarrhea Abdominal Pain Fatigue Fever Vomiting Weight Loss In these cases, it is crucial to obtain objective testing to prove your symptoms are a result of your diagnosis.  In my experience, in cases of individuals with severe Crohn’s disease, many of these tests have been performed before I even talk to my client.  A comprehensive medical file can be key to you receiving your disability benefits.  The SSA usually wants to see that you have exhausted all avenues for treatment in an attempt to resolve your condition.  The Social Security Administration examines Crohn’s disease in its Listing of Impairments under Listing 5.00 Digestive System.  These listings define qualifying criteria for disabilities and the objective testing used to prove the severity of the condition.  Listings can be difficult to interpret without the aid of a trained physician or qualified attorney.  Many times, I will ask a treating physician to complete a questionnaire to show the client meets those criteria.  Another way to win your Social Security disability claim is to show the SSA and an Administrative Law Judge that your condition is so severe you cannot sustain full-time employment.  This can be done … Continued

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June 8, 2018

Autism and Social Security Disability Benefits

As an Indiana Social Security Disability Attorney, I have noticed an increase in the number of children and young adults diagnosed with Autism.  My office takes great pride in helping these individuals get the benefits they deserve.  Preparing these claims for the Social Security Administration (SSA) usually takes a focused approach to show an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) the severity of this condition.  This blog will briefly outline some of the information I believe is important in proving a claim for an individual who experiences Autism. The good news is that the SSA does recognize Autism as a disabling condition.  In the SSA’s Listing of Impairments, Autism is covered under Listing 112.10 for children and 12.10 for adults.  Using these guidelines, a Social Security disability lawyer can craft arguments to help show the person qualifies for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Many times, a Medical Source Statement may be obtained by a treating source showing that the applicant meets these criteria. Through years of representing those with Autism, I have noticed many common symptoms that are considered severe by the SSA.  These can include, but are not limited to: Social impairments Communication impairments Heightened sensitivity to noise, food, clothing, etc. Repetitive behaviors Other medical conditions linked to Autism This brief list is not intended to be all inclusive because Autism is on a spectrum, and the symptoms may vary in severity and existence from individual to individual. The ability to function may also vary greatly from person to person so, as an attorney representing children or young adults with Autism, it is very important to identify which symptoms are the most severe. When preparing clients for a disability hearing, I try to ask as many questions concerning their disability to find out what aspects … Continued

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April 19, 2018

Hip Pain and Social Security Disability

Hip degeneration or injuries can be very disabling. Over time, you may notice increased inflammation, swelling, or significant pain. If you are unable to work because of a hip impairment, you may be eligible for disability benefits from the Social Security Administration. If hip impairments or other conditions prevent you from working, you may want to consult an attorney right away to discuss whether you should apply for disability benefits. Do your injuries cause you to use a cane, walker, or wheelchair to get around? If your medical provider has given you a prescription for one of these assistive devices, you should keep a copy. That prescription can prove to Social Security that your assistive device is medically necessary. The need for an assistive device can significantly reduce the number of jobs that can be performed in a work setting. Social Security also evaluates disability claims using its Listing of Impairments, which outlines certain criteria that Social Security can use to determine whether a person is disabled. Typically, Social Security evaluates hip or joint impairments under Listing 1.02- Major Dysfunction of a Joint(s). In order to prove the severity of your condition, objective testing such as MRIs, x-rays, or CT scans are crucial. Additionally, medical records from surgeries, physical therapy, or injections can show your current level of functioning. Social Security will consider limitations you have sitting, standing, or walking that are caused by your hip impairments. It is important to show Social Security that you are complying with your treatment plan, especially if your symptoms are not resolving. If your limitations prevent you from performing or keeping a job, it may be in your best interest to consult with an attorney to help you through the Social Security disability process.  Hip degeneration is not the only  impairment that our … Continued

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February 19, 2018

Knee Pain and Social Security Disability

Can I receive Social Security Disability for knee pain?  Have you suffered an injury to your knees or experienced gradual deterioration in your knees that limits your ability to work? Knee pain can be so severe that an individual is not only unable to stand for long, but it can also limit his/her ability to tolerate prolonged sitting.  When it comes to weight bearing joints like the knees, daily exertion can lead to worsening symptoms.  Common problems include pain, swelling, and instability.  If you are unable to work due to knee problems, I suggest you apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income immediately. The inability to stand, walk, or ambulate effectively can limit the performance of most jobs above the sedentary level.  Many vocational experts (VEs) state that most jobs performed while standing up require the ability to stand or walk at least six hours out of an eight-hour day.  If a cane or other assistive device is required, it may prevent the performance of any competitive employment.  In my experience, the number of jobs can greatly decrease if a claimant has been prescribed a cane or walker.  Limiting the number of jobs a claimant can perform, known as eroding the job base, can be the key to a favorable Social Security determination. Many of my clients with chronic knee problems report swelling and pain, even while sitting.  Sometimes, they report that elevation of their legs can reduce that swelling and pain.  Many VEs will testify in disability hearings that elevation of the legs over a certain height can preclude work at the sedentary exertional level.  A statement from a qualified medical source supporting the need to elevate the legs, the height of the elevation, and the duration of the elevation can be crucial to establishing … Continued

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November 17, 2017

Can I Receive Social Security Disability for an Anxiety Disorder?

I represent many people with mental disorders, and anxiety is no exception.  This diagnosis can stand alone, or at times, it may be accompanied by other mental and physical disorders.  I have found that some of my clients’ symptoms from anxiety can be so severe that they are unable to interact with friends, family, or even leave their house to do routine activities.  With severe symptoms, the thought of dealing with the public, co-­­workers, and supervisors can be difficult, if not impossible.  In my experience, to win a Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim, essential information from a treating qualified mental health professional is generally needed. Anxiety can also cause problems with maintaining focus.  My clients often report issues with racing thoughts, trouble focusing, increased phobias, problems with change in routine, or difficulty sleeping at night.  Additionally, panic attacks can be a major issue for clients who suffer from anxiety.  These attacks can have varying degrees of frequency, duration, or severity; they can even lead to a need for emergency medical treatment.  Any of these symptoms can cause issues in the workplace that would prevent an individual from staying on task and completing a work day. By showing the Social Security Administration that you experience these symptoms through medical records or testimony, it can strengthen your claim for disability benefits. The Social Security Administration recognizes Anxiety Disorder in its Listing of Impairments under Listing 12.06.  At times, it can be difficult to meet or equal one of these listings, so it is important to receive treatment and have records from hospitalizations, treatment and progress notes, and any medical source statements your mental health professional can provide. Compliance with treatment can be a huge factor in receiving disability payments.  If you are not taking medications as … Continued

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October 26, 2017

Social Security Disability and Diabetes

In my Indianapolis, Indiana Social Security disability practice, I handle numerous cases involving Diabetes.  Since there can be so many varying degrees of severity with Diabetes, I try to find out how it affects each individual client regarding their ability to work.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes Diabetes as a disabling condition either by itself or combined with other severe impairments. Diabetes can occur when the body does not produce enough glucose due to a lack of insulin.  Medical treatment and dietary control can sometimes help to control Diabetes, but other times it does not.  Uncontrolled Diabetes can create a variety of symptoms and these can include but are not limited to: Neuropathy (Nerve damage in the feet and/or hands. This is by far the most common symptom I see in my practice.) Retinopathy (Vision impairment) Fatigue Nephropathy (Kidney disease) Extreme hunger and/or thirst Frequent urination Just having the above symptoms is not enough to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  They must be severe enough to meet or equal one of the SSA’s Listing of Impairments or prevent you from working a full-time job.  Most of my clients with Diabetes say that the neuropathy they experience makes them unable to work.  They complain of numbness and/or tingling in their hands and/or feet that prevents them from standing and walking or using their hands for fine and gross manipulation. As with all disability claims, medical documentation can be essential to a favorable outcome.  Compliance with medical treatment can show that even though you are taking prescribed medication (including insulin), your severe impairment still exists.  Objective testing such as nerve conduction studies for neuropathy and vision tests for retinopathy can go a long way in convincing an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) that you are … Continued

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July 31, 2017

Can I Receive Social Security Disability for Bipolar Disorder?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes Bipolar Disorder as a disabling condition that can result in disability payments.  My clients often tell me Bipolar Disorder prevents them from getting and keeping a job.  While the symptoms may vary from person to person, I see many of my clients simply not having the ability to concentrate or focus long enough to maintain employment. The SSA acknowledges Bipolar Disorder in its Listing of Impairments under listing 12.04 Depressive, Bipolar, and Other Related Disorders.  If you meet or equal this listing, you may be eligible for benefits.  However, there also may be technical criteria that must be met.  Since there is no objective testing that can show the presence of Bipolar Disorder; hospitalizations, ongoing therapy records, and medication compliance may be the key to receiving benefits. In my Social Security Disability practice, one of the challenges to these cases can be consistent and ongoing therapy records, as the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder is not going to be enough.  The SSA generally wants to see a client-patient relationship documenting the ongoing mental illness and compliance with medications prescribed.  If the symptoms still exist after pursuing consistent treatment, then your claim may be given greater weight. A medical source statement from a treating mental health specialist can help the Social Security Administration and/or an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) determine your condition is severe enough to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Some health care professionals are unwilling to produce these types of documents, but it may be in your best interest to ask if they will take the time to do so.  In my experience, these statements should contain a clear diagnosis, how long the condition has lasted and is expected to last, the symptoms, and an opinion on … Continued

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June 12, 2017

Is Your Back Pain Preventing You From Working?

I have represented thousands of my Indiana neighbors in their Social Security disability claims, and I can easily say back pain is the most common disabling condition I see.  This pain can be so severe an individual cannot stand, walk, or even sit for any extended period of time.  These types of postural limitations can create an inability to hold down any type of job.  Many of my clients need to change positions constantly, lie down, and take very strong medication just to make the pain bearable. When reviewing your case, there are specific things the Social Security Administration (SSA) will examine.  For example, do you have objective testing showing the severity of your condition?  Just complaining about back pain is usually not going to get you benefits.  Objective testing like X-rays and MRI’s indicating the severity of your condition can be key in a finding of disability. Are you complying with or seeking appropriate treatment?  In my experience, the SSA and most judges want to see that you are trying to make your back better.  This is often done through medication, physical therapy, electrical stimulation, injections, and surgeries.   Exhausting some, or all, of these avenues and still experiencing severe pain can show the SSA you are complying with treatment and that the pain still persists. The SSA has various rules it uses when evaluating back problems.  It can find you disabled by using its Listing of Impairments or by deciding whether or not you have such severe functional limitations you are unable to work an eight-hour day, five days a week.  It is also important to remember the SSA will examine all of your impairments in combination when deciding if you are disabled.  Many of my clients have more than one severe impairment that is creating their inability to … Continued

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April 26, 2017

Breathing Problems and Social Security Disability

Many of my clients having breathing problems as either their sole issue or as just another problem among the many they experience. Breathing problems such as Emphysema, Asthma, COPD, or any other impairment can make it extremely difficult to work.  Sometimes it is very apparent just by talking to an individual, while other times it is more obvious when they are exerting themselves.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) does consider breathing problems when determining a disabling condition.  It may be wise for you to file a Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim if you find this or any other condition prevents you from working. My clients often complain that their breathing problems cause many symptoms including but not limited to: Shortness of Breath Fatigue Chest pain Constant coughing Wheezing Chronic Respiratory Infections Unfortunately, many lung problems can be permanent in nature. As with all disabling conditions, the SSA will usually need medical documentation to prove your disabling condition.  A Pulmonary Function Test may help to persuade the SSA your condition is severe enough to receive disability payments.  The Social Security Administration examines pulmonary disorders under the provisions in its Listing of Impairments.  Listing 3.00 Respiratory Disorders outlines the information the SSA uses to determine if a person meets or equals this disabling condition. Receiving the correct type of treatment can be the key to a successful outcome in a Social Security disability appeal. A qualified pulmonologist may be able to provide the medical documentation needed for the SSA to grant your claim.  It is important to remember to let the SSA know you have issues with your breathing, even though it may not be your primary reason for filing a disability claim.  The SSA can consider all of your impairments in combination when deciding if … Continued

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