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December 20, 2016

Digestive Problems and Social Security Disability

The impact of digestive problems can be very disabling. I have seen a large increase in the amount of these cases in my practice.  Whether it is due to better detection by physicians or an ever increasing amount of individuals suffering from these disorders, it is obvious these conditions can make a huge impact on a person’s life. While it may seem to you that the Social Security Administration (SSA) does not understand the difficulties you are experiencing, they do acknowledge these disorders in its Listing of Impairments. Listing 5.00 Digestive System-Adult may address a condition you are experiencing.  The Listing of Impairments is a guideline the SSA uses to establish criteria they acknowledge as disabling.  The SSA will usually not only send you to a consultative examination, but obtain and review your medical records from treating physicians to determine if you meet these guidelines.  Unfortunately, in my experience, many individuals are not found disabled on initial application and find themselves appealing their Social Security Disability (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim. The SSA should determine your Residual Functional Capacity (RFC). Your RFC is basically what your limitations are after your impairments are taken into account. I find many of my clients have symptoms such as, but not limited to: Diarrhea Constipation Abdominal pain Nausea Vomiting Bloating Bleeding Obviously, these are only a representative sample of symptoms. The severity of these symptoms vary greatly among my clients.   The SSA may find you disabled because of the severity of these symptoms. Your symptoms could cause you to be off task too often to compete in a work environment.  You may also have too many absences due to your health to maintain employment.  Digestive issues can create a number of problems that make you unable to work.   I represent … Continued

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November 25, 2016

Should I Bring a Cane To My Social Security Disability Hearing?

Many of my clients need an assistive device to get around more easily. The need for a cane, crutches, walker, or wheelchair may be necessary to walk even the shortest of distances.  Asking if you need to bring one of these items to your Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) hearing should not even be a question.  You either need this type of assistance or you do not.  The inability to ambulate effectively is necessary to fulfill a wide variety of jobs above the sedentary (Sitting) exertional level.  The need for such an item can erode the job base and can enhance your chances of winning your claim. Is it good enough just to go pick up a cane at the local pharmacy without a prescription or maybe borrow one from a relative? Many Administrative Law Judges (ALJ’s) will require you to have a prescription for an assistive device from your treating physician in order to recognize it as being medically necessary.  Many judges will not acknowledge the need for a cane without a physician stating it is necessary even though you may have been using it for years.  Documentation from treating sources can be key in a successful Social Security disability claim. Any medical source statements showing your inability to stand or walk for any extended duration may also convince the SSA that you are unable to perform certain types of occupations. As you age, and at the same time, have never engaged in or acquired transferable skills to a sitting occupation the SSA may find you disabled pertaining to medical vocational guidelines they use to make a finding of disability.  In Social Security’s world you inability to walk and stand can be a major factor in a finding of disability. In summary, this blog … Continued

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August 19, 2016

If I Had a Stroke, Can I Receive Social Security Disability?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) can determine whether or not you can receive disability payments for the after-effects of a stroke.  While there are two separate disability programs, Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI), the medical requirements to receive payments are the same.  The mental and physical residuals from a stroke can make it difficult, if not impossible, to maintain full time employment. Your first step is to file an initial application.  Some individuals who have suffered a stroke may have difficulty even starting the application process due to difficulties with communication, memory, and typing or writing.  Get help from a friend or family member to start the application if you need to; Social Security recommends that you designate a “third party” whom they can contact if they need additional information.  The application process is designed by Social Security to be completed by an individual without the assistance of an attorney or representative.  However, I have helped many clients file an initial application because they preferred to have the help of someone familiar with the process.  For someone dealing with memory loss, difficulty speaking, and problems getting around, it can be helpful to have an attorney or representative take charge of the case to make sure everything gets submitted on time and to patiently assist with the completion of Social Security’s forms and questionnaires. How does the SSA evaluate individuals suffering from a stroke when determining disability?  First, they decide whether you “meet a listing.”  The SSA publishes a Listing of Impairments that details the information they consider for each specific condition.  Stroke is covered in the listing for neurological impairments under Section 11.04.  What happens if you do not meet or equal the listing for stroke?  Social Security then evaluates whether your residual functional capacity … Continued

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February 24, 2016

Social Security Disability for Breast Cancer

While many people fully recover and are able to return to work after being diagnosed with breast cancer, some do not.  Unfortunately, for some people, the treatments and procedures do not work, or they not work well enough to allow the patient to return to her previous level of functioning.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes breast cancer and other types of cancers as disabling conditions. Even though a breast cancer diagnosis can be scary and life-altering, in my Indianapolis Social Security Disability practice I see many of these types of claims denied.  Here are a few common reasons Social Security gives for denying breast cancer claims: Your condition has not lasted, or is not expected to last, twelve months or longer.  Often, the Social Security reviewers will review your diagnosis and medical records, see that you are receiving treatment, and conclude that you will improve enough to return to work within twelve months from the date you were diagnosed.  If that turns out to be the case, then you will not be eligible for Social Security Disability or Supplemental Security Income benefits, no matter how severely you were disabled during the months you were receiving treatment.  However, for many people, treatment extends beyond twelve months or leaves them with residual symptoms that do not improve, even if the cancer goes into remission.  For example, some of my clients acquire neuropathy in their arms from the effects of chemotherapy, and others have painful scarring that prevents them from being able to use their arms the way they used to.  Therefore, even if Social Security denies your claim because you are expected to get better, it is a good idea to appeal that denial to keep your claim going in case your recovery does not go as well as expected. Your … Continued

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December 31, 2015

Can I Get Social Security Disability For COPD?

If your symptoms are severe enough, Social Security can find you disabled if you have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).  However, a diagnosis on its own is not enough.  In my practice, I find that COPD is disabling to my clients in two ways – either because their COPD symptoms are so severe that they are unable to work, or because their COPD symptoms combine with symptoms from other impairments to keep them from working. I am surprised at how many of my clients have breathing difficulties.  Their diagnoses range from asthma to emphysema.  My experience with clients with breathing problems is that their symptoms generally do not improve with time.  If you find you are unable to work due to COPD or any other breathing problem, it may be in your best interest to apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as soon as possible. The Social Security Administration (SSA) examines COPD in its Listing of Impairments under listing 3.02 for chronic pulmonary insufficiency.  The listings in section 3 cover many other types of respiratory impairments as well, including asthma, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, persistent pulmonary infections, and cor pulomale due to chronic pulmonary vascular hypertension.  If you have COPD or any other respiratory problem, Social Security will probably order a “pulmonary function test” to objectively determine the extent of the obstruction to your airways.  If you are already being treated by a pulmonologist, you may have already had one or more pulmonary function tests performed.  Social Security will request records from your doctor, which will include these test results as well as your doctor’s diagnoses and clinical impressions. Another way to meet the requirements of the listings in section 3 is to show that you have frequent respiratory exacerbations that require physician intervention.  If … Continued

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November 3, 2015

Social Security Disability Payments for Neurological Impairments

There are many medical conditions that can so severely affect an individual’s mental and physical functioning as to qualify that person for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. In my Indianapolis Social Security disability practice I represent many Indiana residents suffering from neurological impairments. Many of those clients suffer from a combination of mental and physical symptoms that prevent them from performing what the Social Security Administration (SSA) calls Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA); in other words, they cannot work a full-time job. In cases involving adults with neurological impairments, the SSA will first consult the listings in Section 11 of its Listing of Impairments. The Listing of Impairments is a guideline published by the Social Security Administration outlining certain criteria that, if met, are considered to be proof that the claimant is disabled. The conditions addressed in the Listings are as follows: • Epilepsy (convulsive or non-convulsive) • Central nervous system vascular accident • Benign brain tumors (malignant brain tumors are evaluated under listings for cancer) • Parkinsonian syndrome • Cerebral palsy • Spinal cord or nerve root lesions • Multiple sclerosis • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis • Anterior poliomyelitis • Myasthenia gravis • Muscular dystrophy • Subacute combined cord degeneration • Other degenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s chorea, Friedreich’s ataxia, or spino-cerebellar degeneration • Cerebral trauma • Syringomyelia Most of the criteria in the Listings for these impairments require evidence of the following: (a) A medical diagnosis and appropriate medical testing (b) Sensory, motor, and/or speech dysfunction (c) Compliance with prescribed treatment See the specific listings for the requirements for each particular impairment. In my experience, a person whose diagnosis and symptoms meet the criteria of the listings should be found disabled in the early stages of the disability process, as long as appropriate medical … Continued

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June 29, 2015

Social Security Disability Benefits for Back Pain

A large number of my clients suffer from back pain, and there are many possible causes: degenerative disease, injury, or years of overexertion.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes that severe back pain can be disabling, but you must have adequate documentation to prove you have a severe medical impairment.  In other words, you must be able to provide medical evidence to show that your pain is the result of a medical diagnosis and that it has more than a minimal effect on your ability to work.  Then you must show that your condition either meets or equals Social Security’s Listing of Impairments §1.04 for disorders of the spine, or that it keeps you from working at your past occupation or any other occupation.  Your age, education level, and work experience can also figure into a finding of disability. What does the SSA mean when they say you must “meet or equal a listing” to be found disabled?  When it comes to your back, the SSA will look at the criteria in §1.00: Musculoskeletal System.  In particular, Listing 1.04: Disorders of the Spine usually comes into play.  To meet Listing 1.04, you must have medical imaging showing that you have nerve root compression, arachnoiditis, or lumbar stenosis in your spine.  You must also have clinical evidence (treatment notes, for example) indicating specific corresponding physical symptoms. If you do not meet or equal a listing, you may be found disabled due to your limited residual function capacity (RFC).  If the SSA finds that your ability to stand, walk, sit, and lift is so decreased by your back pain that you are unable to work, you might be found disabled.  In this scenario, the SSA may also take into consideration your age, education, and prior work experience to determine if you are … Continued

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May 5, 2015

Asperger’s Syndrome and Obtaining Social Security Disability Benefits

Often, my blog topics reflect certain disabling conditions or Social Security disability issues that seem to be becoming more prevalent in my practice.  Asperger’s Syndrome is definitely one of these conditions; I represent many children and adults who have been given this diagnosis. Of course, the most recent DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which was released in May of 2013) no longer contains a diagnosis of “Asperger’s Syndrome”; the disorder, along with other disorders such Pervasive Development Disorder NOS, is now included under the diagnosis of “Autism Spectrum Disorder.”  As people with Asperger’s and their families know, it doesn’t matter what it’s called; the symptoms and limitations remain. People with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder typically have social communication and interaction deficits and restrictive, repetitive patterns of behavior.  These symptoms often interfere with an adult’s ability to work or with a child’s ability to function at an age-appropriate developmental level.  If you or your child have these symptoms, you could be eligible for benefits under Social Security’s Disability Insurance (SSDI) program or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. Whether you are an adult or a child on the autism spectrum, the first way the Social Security Administration (SSA) assesses whether your impairment is disabling under its rules is by referring to the entry for “autistic disorder and other pervasive developmental disorders” in its Listing of Impairments.  The relevant listing for adults is Listing 12.10; the relevant listing for children is Listing 112.10.  First, Social Security will determine whether you meet the diagnostic criteria for an autism spectrum diagnosis.  Next, it will evaluate how severely your symptoms affect your ability to function.  For adults, this means an adjudicator will determine how markedly your symptoms impair your activities of daily living, your social functioning, and your ability to maintain … Continued

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April 28, 2015

Symptoms of Depression That May Make you Eligible for Social Security Disability Payments

Many of the clients I serve in my Indianapolis disability practice suffer from some type of depressive disorder.  Sometimes their symptoms of depression are caused by or exacerbated by physical impairments, but often depression is a disabling condition all by itself. Depression raises some unique obstacles in pursuing a Social Security disability claim.  Deadlines must be met, appointments must be kept, and paperwork must be completed in a timely and thorough manner.  If you have depression, though, you may lack the energy to keep track of your paperwork or even open your mail.  You might be so socially and emotionally isolated that you do not attend appointments or return telephone calls.  You may have difficulty maintaining attention long enough to complete questionnaires about your symptoms and work history.  If you aren’t able to fulfill these obligations, it is likely your claim will be dismissed.  It can be really helpful if you allow a family member or friend to help you make sure everything gets finished completely and on time. The Social Security Administration (SSA) addresses the disability nature of depression and other affective disorders in its Listing of Impairments at Listing 12.04.  To meet the requirements of this listing, you first much be able to show that you have medically documented symptoms such as: “Anhedonia,” or a persistent, all-encompassing loss of interest in your daily activities, even things you used to like to do Disturbance in your appetite causing weight gain or loss Sleep disturbance Psychomotor agitation (unintentional, purposeless movement) or retardation (listlessness, inability to physically carry out everyday activities) Lack of energy Guilt or feelings of worthlessness Problems concentrating or thinking Suicidal thoughts Hallucinations, delusions, or paranoia It is not enough for you to explain to Social Security what your symptoms are and how they affect you.  You must … Continued

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March 30, 2015

Diabetes and Your Social Security Disability Claim

If you suffer from diabetes and your symptoms keep you from being able to work, you may be eligible for either Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. The prevalence of diabetes among my clients seems to be ever increasing.  Some of my clients suffer from Type I diabetes, which typically starts in childhood.  However, most of my clients with diabetes have Type II diabetes, or adult-onset diabetes.  Unfortunately, many of my clients have medical impairments that greatly increase their risk of developing diabetes, such as cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol.  Others develop risk factors such as obesity, poor diet, and physical inactivity due to the physical limitations caused by their other medical impairments.  If you suffer from diabetes, even if you do not consider it to be the most disabling condition you have, its effects on your ability to work may be substantial.  When talking to Social Security about your disabling conditions, it is always important to discuss all of your impairments, even if you don’t think a particular condition like diabetes would be disabling to you all by itself.  Social Security determines your limitations based on the combination of all of your functional limitations that result from any and all medically determinable impairments you have. While the Social Security Administration (SSA) addresses diabetes in Section 9.00 of its Listing of Impairments, diabetes is no longer a listed impairment.  (Social Security removed the listing for diabetes in 2011.)  Instead, Social Security notes that the effects of diabetes on different body systems might allow you to meet or equal other sections of the Listings.  In Social Security Ruling 14-2p, the SSA identifies some examples of the effects of diabetes, including: Diabetic neuropathy (evaluated under Listing 11.14 for peripheral neuropathies) Diabetic retinopathy (evaluated under … Continued

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