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March 4, 2014

Social Security Disability Benefits for Claimants with Diabetes

Diabetes (also known as diabetes mellitus) has two main types.  Type 1 DM (diabetes mellitus) comes from the body’s inability to produce insulin.  People with this condition typically have to inject themselves with insulin or wear an insulin pump.  Type 2 DM stems from the body’s resistance to insulin – that is, the body’s cells cannot properly use insulin.  Type 2 DM is also known as adult-onset diabetes. Some symptoms of diabetes may include: weight loss frequent urination increased thirst increased hunger skin rashes blurred vision These symptoms may onset in a matter of weeks after triggered (usually by certain infections from the environment) for type 1 patients as opposed to slowly or not at all for type 2 diabetes patients.  Type 1 diabetes is usually inherited, with certain infections bringing it out.  Type 2 diabetes is typically caused by lifestyle habits and genetics.  There is no known cure for diabetes. Diabetes can often be controlled with medicine and/or lifestyle changes.  Sometimes, though, in spite of the patient’s best efforts, symptoms persist.  For example, some medical conditions might prevent the patient from being able to tolerate necessary medication or endure an exercise program.  Consistent access to treatment and medication is another hurdle many patients face due to lack of insurance and financial resources. Diabetes can be a very debilitating condition, and it is possible to receive Social Security Disability benefits because of it.  There is not a specific listing for diabetes in the Social Security Administration’s Listing of Impairments, but diabetes is addressed  in Section 9.00 – Endocrine Disorders.  Simply having a diagnosis of diabetes is not enough to meet Social Security’s definition of disability.  Your diabetes must cause functional limitations that prevent you from performing work-like activities on a regular and continuing basis. Diabetes may cause some symptoms that … Continued

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January 23, 2014

Back Pain and Social Security Disability Benefits

In my Indianapolis Social Security disability practice, most of my clients include back pain as an impairment that keeps them from working.  If you have ever suffered from back pain, you may understand why these individuals claim they are simply in too much pain to perform even the most simple tasks.  You can receive disability benefits for back pain, but it will take more than simply claiming that your back hurts.  In my experience, you are going to need medical records that support your claim.  In this blog I will describe what I find helpful in proving your case. Objective testing – Tests such as MRIs and x-rays can show the severity of your condition.  In my experience these tests, especially MRIs, can make a big difference in proving that your pain is caused by a severe medical impairment.  Some findings that indicate severe impairments include nerve root impingement and severe stenosis. Medical procedures –  What are you doing to try to resolve the problem?  If you are not receiving treatment for your back pain, or if you are resisting the treatment options presented by your doctor, Social Security may conclude that your pain does not bother you that much.  Some of the procedures doctors recommend for back pain include surgery, injections, and physical therapy. Medical source statements –  Sometimes winning your disability claim requires an extra push and some support from your medical provider.  My office strives to get our client’s treating physicians to complete medical source statements.  These statements include Physical Residual Functional Capacity Assessments and questionnaires regarding whether you meet or equal Social Security’s Listing of Impairments as described below. One of the ways Social Security can find you disabled is if you meet or equal its Listing of Impairments.  Listing 1.04 details how an individual can … Continued

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January 9, 2014

Is Chronic Pain Syndrome Recognized as a Qualifying Disability?

Even though the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) listing of impairments is relatively long, chronic pain syndrome is not specifically listed. But this does not mean that you cannot receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for your condition.   The SSA’s listing of impairments is very detailed and has listings for most health issues. There are a handful of listings that might be related to your back pain.  They may include but are not limited to: 1.00 Musculoskeletal System 5.00 Digestive System 11.00 Neurological 12.00 Mental Disorders 14.00 Immune System Disorders If you have chronic pain due to any of the conditions on the SSA’s listing of impairments, it is possible that the SSA will approve your claim in the initial application or the reconsideration stages.  However, this is rarely the case.  It is normal for a claim to go all the way to the hearing stage, which usually takes about a year. In my experience, to have the best possible chance at winning your disability claim, you need to have as thorough and up to date medical records as possible.  No matter how severe your chronic back pain is, it does not qualify by itself for Social Security Disability benefits.  We must prove to the judge that even though you do not meet listing exactly, your limited functionality keeps you from working a normal eight hour per day job.   If your case does meet a listing exactly, we must prove that you have a “residual functioning capacity ” (RFC) low enough that you cannot work a normal eight hour job.  In determining your RFC the Social Security Administration may look at a few things including but not limited to: Sitting, standing, and walking limitations Lifting and carrying limitations Postural limitations Limitations of manipulation of your hands If you have … Continued

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January 8, 2014

Can I Receive Social Security Disability Benefits for Autism?

In my Indiana Social Security disability practice I am seeing a growing number of cases involving autism. Autism is a developmental disorder that is usually diagnosed within the first three years of a person’s life. It mainly hinders an individual’s communication and social interaction skills. Both children and adults can receive Social Security disability benefits for autism. Autism is diagnosed based on the patient’s behavior. According to many medical sources an individual must display at least six symptoms to be diagnosed as autistic. Of these six symptoms two must be impairments in social interaction, one must be an impairment in communication, and one must be restricted and repetitive behavior. Some examples of these symptoms include: not making friends with children of the same age, problems starting or participating in conversations, and insisting on always taking the same route to a destination. Autism is classified as a pervasive developmental disorder (PDD). Autism and other PDDs are defined by irregular social interactions and communication as well as very limited interests and highly repetitive behavior. PDDs are not characterized by any emotional problems, sickness, or fragility. Social Security defines adult autism in its Listing of Impairments under section 12.10 – Autistic Disorder and Other Pervasive Developmental Disorders. The Social Security Administration (SSA) requires two types of evidence to show that a claimant meets this listing. First, the claimant must demonstrate medical findings to support his or her diagnosis. Second, the claimant must show a certain level of impairment in functioning. Below is the listing for adult autism from the SSA’s Listing of Impairments. Medically documented findings of all of the following: Qualitative deficits in reciprocal social interaction Qualitative deficits in verbal and nonverbal communication and in imaginative activity Markedly restricted repertoire of activities and interests Resulting in at least two of the following: … Continued

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January 1, 2014

Social Security Disability Benefits for Chronic Migraines

At times it may be difficult, it is possible to receive Social Security Disability benefits for severe migraines. My clients who suffer from this type of headache have migraines that can last from 2 to 72 hours, and are very debilitating. It is important that you have thorough medical records to document the persistence and severity of the migraines to prove how they affect your ability to work. Most doctors believe that migraines are a neurovascular disorder. The exact mechanism for the head pain is still up for debate, but some patients with debilitating migraines can feel an “aura”, or a spreading of pain throughout the brain and surrounding blood vessels. Migraines can be diagnosed by using the “5, 4, 3, 2, 1 criteria” according to the International Headache Society. This can be used for patients whether they can feel the aura or not. According to the I.H.S. symptoms of migraines include: Five or more attacks (two if patient can feel the aura) 4 hours to 3 days in duration Two or more of the following: Unilateral (affecting only half of the head) Pulsating Moderate or severe pain intensity Aggravation by causing avoidance of routine physical activity One or more of the following Nausea and/or vomiting Sensitivity to both light and sound Social Security does not have a specific listing for migraines in its List of Impairments, but this does not mean that you cannot receive disability benefits if your migraines keep you from being able to work. With a solid documented medical history, a good case can be made for social security benefits. From my experience, some of the most important evidence in showing the Social Security Administration that migraine headaches keep you from working are medical records showing a history of consistent treatment, preferably by a migraine specialist.Some … Continued

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December 26, 2013

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and Social Security Disability Benefits

Does a breathing disorder keep you from working a full time job? It is possible to receive Social Security Disability benefits for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and other breathing disorders. With a well-documented medical history that shows how your COPD affects your ability to work, a good claim can be made for Social Security Disability benefits. COPD is an obstructive lung disease that is characterized by very poor airflow. Many people who suffer from COPD have emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Currently there is no cure for COPD, and unfortunately studies show that it usually worsens over time. Most treatments for COPD aim to stop the progression of the disease, not to cure it. It is important that individuals with COPD do not contract any other lung or airway condition, as these can be very detrimental to your health. The most common symptoms of COPD include sputum (mucus) production, coughing, and shortness of breath. COPD can be caused by: Smoking Air Pollution Occupational Exposures Dust Chemicals Fumes Genetics To diagnose your COPD, your doctor will most likely look at your past medical history, record your symptoms, and conduct some lung function tests. The Social Security Administration appreciates a thorough medical history with well documented diagnoses. As part of the application process, Social Security may send you for a pulmonary function test to measure the effect of your COPD on your breathing capacity. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is classified in the Listing of Impairments under section 3.00 – Respiratory System. COPD falls under section 3.02 – Chronic Pulmonary Insufficiency. In this section there are a few tests that look at lung force and volume. The results will depend on your height, but if your pulmonary function testing falls within certain ranges, you may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits. Even … Continued

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October 8, 2013

Can I receive Social Security Disability benefits for a Skin Disorder?

As a disability lawyer, I get many calls from my Indiana neighbors asking if their impairment will qualify them for Social Security Disability benefits. If you have a skin disorder and you are unable to work, you may qualify for benefits. Skin disorders that result from hereditary, congenital, or acquired pathological processes are identified in Section 8.00 of the SSA listing of impairments.  The following Skin Disorders are included in this category and may meet the SSA disability guidelines: Ichthyosis Bullous Disease Chronic infections of the skin or mucous membranes Dermatitis Hidradenitis Suppurativa Genetic photosensitivity disorders Burns The Social Security Administration will need medical documentation from “acceptable medical sources” to evaluate the presence and severity of your disorder.  Information commonly needed for a skin disorder disability claim is; the onset date, duration and prognosis, frequency of flare-ups, location, size and appearance.  To confirm a diagnosis the SSA may need laboratory findings such as biopsy and blood tests results.   Your symptoms (including pain) will be assessed to determine how they impact your daily life and your ability to work.  The effects of any treatment you receive to include medication, therapy and surgery will be assessed.  This information is useful in determining the severity of your impairment.  Your skin disorder may respond well to treatment, however the side effects can result in limitations. Any adverse effects of the treatment will be assessed.  Do not be discouraged if your condition does not meet the SSA listing.  If you continue the claims process, your claim will still be evaluated by the SSA.  Your limitations and symptoms may affect your ability to work without specifically meeting the listing. The SSA wants to determine if you can perform your past relevant job(s), or if there are other jobs you have the ability to perform.  Many of my Indiana clients with a skin disorder complain that they are unable to work because they have lesions that are painful and require extensive treatment.  … Continued

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October 4, 2013

What documentation do I need for my cirrhosis of the liver disability claim?

As a disability lawyer in Indiana, I speak to clients daily about the documentation they need to prove their Social Security disability claims.   Once you have applied for benefits, the Social Security Administration (SSA) will, with your permission, request medical records from the physicians and other medical providers who have treated or evaluated you for your impairments.  As you proceed through the appeals process, the SSA will request updated information from your providers, and if you reach a hearing, the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) will make sure that all of your medical records have been added to your Social Security file.  For some impairments, including cirrhosis of the liver, it is very important that your medical records include complete documentation of your symptoms and objective evidence of your condition. Cirrhosis of the liver is evaluated by the SSA as a digestive system impairment.  If you have cirrhosis of the liver, the SSA’s Listing of Impairments Section 5.05 for chronic liver disease requires documentation of at least one of the following: Hemorrhaging due to esophageal, gastric, or ectopic varices or portal hypertensive gastropathy, resulting in hemodynamic instability and requiring hospitalization for transfusion.  Acceptable documentation includes: Endoscopy X-rays Ascites or hydrothorax, in spite of continuing treatment, on at least two evaluations at least sixty days apart.  Acceptable documentation includes: Laboratory tests showing serum albumin of 3.0 g/dL or less Coagulation studies showing increased International Normalized Ratio (INR) Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.  Acceptable documentation includes: Laboratory tests showing an absolute neutrophil count of at least 250 cells/mm3. Hepatorenal syndrome.  Acceptable documentation includes: Documentation of low arterial oxygenation Echocardiography (ECG) or lung perfusion scan showing intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting Hepatic encephalopathy.  Acceptable documentation includes: Documentation of abnormal mental state or cognitive dysfunction Documentation of surgical portosystemic shunt placement Documentation of neurological abnormalities such as asterixis Electroencephalogram (EEG) Serum albumin … Continued

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October 2, 2013

Is Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) a disabling impairment for Social Security Benefits?

Many Indiana residents who have HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection or AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) contact my Indianapolis office to ask if their condition will qualify them for Social Security disability benefits. If you have HIV/ AIDS and your symptoms keep you from being able to work, you may qualify for benefits from the Social Security Administration. There are two ways to show the Social Security Administration (SSA) that your HIV/AIDS is a disabling condition; you can show that your symptoms “meet the listing” for HIV, or you can show that your combination of impairments reduce your capacity to perform work activities. HIV infection is addressed by §14.08 of Social Security’s Listing of Impairments.  If your medical records show that you fulfill the criteria of this listing, Social Security will most likely find that you are disabled.  First, your medical records must contain documentation that you have HIV infection, either from laboratory test results or other evidence.  Then, you must show that you have at least one of the following: Bacterial infections such as mycobacterial infection, nocardiosis, Salmonella bacteremia, or other recurrent infections requiring hospitalization or frequent IV antibiotic treatment Fungal infections such as aspergillosis; certain types of candidiasis, coccidioidomycosis, cryptococcosis; histoplasmosis; mucormycosis; or Pneumocystis Protozoan or helminthic infections such as cryptosporidiosis, isosporiasis, or microsporidiosis that cause diarrhea; extra-intestinal strongyloidiasis; or some types of toxoplasmosis Viral infections such as certain types of cytomegalovirus disease, certain types of herpes simplex, certain types of herpes zoster, or progressive multifocal leukoencephalopthy Malignant neoplasms such as certain types of carcinoma, Kaposi’s sarcoma, lymphoma, or squamous cell carcinoma HIV encephalopathy with progressive cognitive or motor dysfunctio HIV wasting syndrome with chronic diarrhea or chronic weakness with fever Chronic, treatment-resistant diarrhea requiring IV hydration or feeding Chronic or treatment-resistant infection such as sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia, septic arthritis, endocarditis, or sinusitis Repeated manifestations of HIV infection that do not fit in the above categories but result in significant, documented symptoms and marked limitation in your activities of daily living, social functioning, … Continued

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September 16, 2013

Spinal Stenosis and Social Security Benefits

Many Indiana residents suffer from severe back problems that make it difficult if not impossible to work.  While back problems can vary, many individuals complain of back pain.  Back pain can result in an inability to stand, walk, and sit for certain periods of time.  If you have been denied disability benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA) and believe you are unable to work it may be wise to appeal that decision.  It is important to remember the majority of disability claims are denied by the SSA, and disabling conditions from your back are no exception. People suffering from Spinal Stenosis may experience pain so severe any chance of working an eight hour day would be very difficult.   In your spine there are spaces that may become narrow causing pressure on your spinal cord.  This can occur in any area of the spine. This may result in : Numbness Pain Difficulties in standing, walking, and sitting Weakness The need for the use of a cane or walker In my experience as an Indianapolis Social Security Disability Lawyer, I find it very important that my clients have appropriate objective medical testing to substantiate their claim for benefits.  A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) test may be the key to meeting or equaling the standards needed to win your claim.  I have found that comprehensive medical documentation from a qualified treating specialist can enhance your odds of proving you are unable to work.  Statements from your treating physicians may also be given weight that is necessary to prove your claim. For many people frustration may set in when going through this process. It is important, in my opinion, that you pursue your appeal if you believe you are unable to work.  Always remember there are time limits when filing a request for … Continued

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