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December 8, 2011

Breast Cancer and Your Indiana Social Security Disbility Claim

Scott D. Lewis is an experienced Indiana Social Security disability lawyer who represents individuals with a wide variety of disabling conditions and cancer is no exception.  If you or someone you know is struggling or cannot work with a disabling condition such as cancer it may be in their best interest to file for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Individuals with advanced breast cancer or individuals undergoing treatment for breast cancer may find it difficult to maintain employment.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes cancer in its Listing of Impairments under Listing 13.00 Malignant Neoplastic Diseases. Specifically Listing 13.10 outlines breast cancer and details what is needed for an individual to meet this listing.   It is important for individuals attempting to receive Social Security disability to not only get proper medical testing to support their claim, but also see qualified medical professionals to document the progression and prognosis of the cancer. When applying for Social Security disability it is important to remember there are not only medical qualifications that must be met, there are also financial and work related qualifications that may be crucial in a valid claim.  If you are frustrated by the disability process or simply have questions regarding the process you can contact Mr. Lewis for a free case evaluation.  Most questions can be answered over the phone and if you hire disability attorney Scott Lewis you pay nothing unless your claim is approved.  For your free consultation  contact Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott Lewis and his staff at (317) 423-8888,

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November 28, 2011

Schizophrenia and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Benefits

Indiana Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) applicants suffering from schizophrenia may qualify for disability benefits. Schizophrenia is a psychological disorder that usually manifest in early adulthood.  Often times, schizophrenia is mistaken for multiple personality disorder. Schizophrenia is a much different psychological diagnosis than multiple personality disorder. Schizophrenia is a thought disorder rather than a disorder that manifest in creating multiple personalities. Even though schizophrenia symptoms vary from person to person, the most common symptoms may include: Confused speech Strange or disorganized behavior Delusions Hallucinations Motivational loss and/or loss of interest in daily activities Difficulties in maintaining social functioning In addition, many individuals who suffer from schizophrenia may experience a loss of cognitive function resulting in a loss of memory and skills required to work. Some individuals may have worked for years before being diagnosed with this disease.  When an individual diagnosed with schizophrenia is no longer able to sustain employment, he/she may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits.   Under the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) “Listing of Impairments”, Section 12.00 Mental Disorders, the SSA describes the criteria used to qualify an individual who suffers with schizophrenia for disability benefits.  Refer to Section 12.03 for more specific evaluation criteria supplied by the SSA.  Meeting this listing may qualify an individual for receiving disability benefits that they may deserve.  It is important and necessary for disability claimant’s suffering from schizophrenia to have medical documentation proving and supporting their disability claim.  Proving a history of this disorder may be key in receiving disability benefits. If you or your loved one suffers from a mental disorder such as schizophrenia, anxiety disorder, bipolar disease or any other impairment and would like to learn more about receiving Social Security disability benefits, please contact disability attorney Scott D. Lewis. The law office of Scott D. Lewis handles disability benefits claims and you can … Continued

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November 23, 2011

Migraine Headaches and Your Indiana Social Security Disability Appeal

Many individuals suffering from chronic migraine headaches find it difficult, if not impossible, to work and perform gainful activity.  Indiana Social Security disability attorney Scott Lewis finds that many of his clients suffering from chronic migraine headaches have similar complaints.  These complaints can include, but are not limited to: The inability to focus or concentrate Sensitivity to light and sound Extreme pain Nausea Problems with vision Chills Fatigue Loss of appetite The Social Security Administration (SSA) can look at the symptoms you are experiencing due to severe migraine headaches in order to decide what limitations you may experience in the work setting.  If it is determined these limitations are severe enough to prevent you from performing a full day of work on a continuous basis you may be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Medical records can be the key to winning your Indiana Social Security disability claim.  In disability attorney Scott Lewis’ experience records from a treating neurologist may greatly enhance your chances of winning your disability claim.  Appropriate testing and imaging combined with a good medical history documenting the severity of your migraine headaches may help your support the fact your are unable to work. If you have questions concerning your Social Security disability claim, you can contact Mr. Lewis by calling (317) 423-8888.  Mr. Lewis handles a wide variety of disabling conditions including migraine headaches, diabetes, depression, heart problems, and learning disabilities just to name a few.  Call now and receive your free case evaluation.

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November 7, 2011

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Filing for Social Security Disability Benefits in Indiana

An individual suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) experiences extreme fatigue.  This fatigue cannot be explained by any underlying medical condition. Although the fatigue may worsen with physical or mental activity, it does not always improve with rest. Individuals suffering with CFS do not know the cause of this disorder and there is no single test to diagnosis an individual with CFS.  Indiana disability claimants diagnosed with CFS may undergo several medical exams to rule out other health problems that have symptoms that are similar resulting in a diagnosis of CFS. Many disability claimants suffering with CFS may find it difficult to prove that they are unable to work due to this condition.  So, how does the Social Security Administration (SSA) approve a Social Security disability claim for individuals suffering with CFS?  According to the SSA’s website, when an individual with CFS applies for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, the SSA must decide whether the individual is disabled under the law. The SSA base their decision on information provided by the claimant and other medical evidence. Under Social Security law, an individual may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits if he or she is: unable to do any substantial gainful activity (SGA) because of a medical condition that has lasted or expected to last for at least 12 months, or that is expected to result in death; or if the individual is under the age or 18, the individual suffers from any medically determinable impairment (physical or mental) that results in marked and severe functional limitations. The disability claimant has a responsibility to provide the SSA proof that the condition exist, the level of severity, and duration of the impairment(s).   It is important to include a thorough medical history, and all clinical and laboratory findings from your treating physicians. In addition, provide the SSA with copies of laboratory results and results of any mental … Continued

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October 5, 2011

Social Security Disability Lawyers in Indianapolis Can Represent You For Many Different Disabling Conditions

Did you know that the Social Security Administration (SSA) can look at all of your disabling conditions combined when making a disability determination?  Indiana disability attorney Scott Lewis tries to get his clients to disclose to him all of their conditions that have an impact on their ability to work.  After questioning his clients, many times Mr. Lewis finds that there are several conditions that when combined create a total picture showing his client is in fact disabled. For instance, you may have had back surgery and are experiencing pain and/or discomfort that may be preventing you from working so; you have filed a Social Security disability claim.  Upon further review of your medical records, Mr. Lewis notices you are also suffering from depression, diabetes, and asthma.  If these other conditions are severe enough, it may be wise to include these conditions in an argument as to why you are unable to work.  While your back may keep you from being able to sit, stand, or walk for any length of time, your depression may make it difficult to concentrate on work related tasks, your diabetes may involve neuropathy causing numbness and tingling in your extremities, and your asthma may cause shortness of breath in certain circumstances.  So, by considering a combination of all of these impairments, it may be clear you are unable to maintain substantial gainful activity. Just stating that you have additional problems is probably not going to be good enough to win your Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim.  Medical records from qualified treating medical professionals specializing in the area where your disability exists is usually the best supporting documentation to help prove your disability claim.  At times, general medical practitioners may work to help support your disability claim, but many times an Administrative Law … Continued

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September 24, 2011

Leukemia and Indiana Social Security Disability Benefits

Are you an individual suffering from chronic or acute leukemia and cannot work because of this disease?  Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects more than 40,000 people per year.  Currently, there is no cure for leukemia. Leukemia occurs when blood cells in the bone marrow grow out of control. Leukemia usually starts with some common symptoms such as: prolonged bleeding, bruising, weakness, weight loss, infections, or pain & swelling in your joints. The earlier leukemia is detected, the more likely it can be treated effectively.  This cancer is highly dangerous, but also highly treatable. Some treatments may include: chemotherapy; radiation therapy; other kinds of drug therapy; and stem cell transplants. Being diagnosed with leukemia can possibly mean a major lifestyle change. Although treatments of these cancers are highly effective and can allow those individuals diagnosed with this cancer to still enjoy a good quality of life, they do not cure the cancer and often leave many side effects that may significantly reduce the quality of life for those who suffer from the disease. If you have been diagnosed with leukemia and are unable to work because of it, you may qualify for Social Security disability benefits. The Social Security Administration’s “Listing of Impairments” outlines the criteria that qualifies an individual with leukemia for disability benefits. In order to qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, you should provide the Social Security Administration (SSA) medical proof of your condition supported by doctor’s exams, imaging technology, blood tests, etc. In addition, if this information also includes statements from your physician(s) asserting that you are unable to work because of your leukemia, it may be beneficial in winning your claim. Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott D. Lewis realizes that dealing with a diagnosis of cancer may be difficult enough, but dealing with financial problems because you can’t work due to this diagnosis … Continued

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September 20, 2011

Social Security Disability Benefits for Claimants Diagnosed with Hepatitis

Some individuals diagnosed with chronic hepatitis are unable to work and find the need to apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) considers Hepatitis under Section 5.00, Digestive System in the “Listing of Impairments.”  The specific listing for Hepatitis is found under Section 5.05 Chronic Liver Disease and to meet this listing for purposes of qualifying for disability benefits, your medical records must indicate one of the following: Esophageal, gastric, or ectopic varices with a documented history of massive hemorrhaging as a result; or Having had a shunt operation due to esophageal varices; or Pathologic fluid collection in the abdomen for three (3) months or more that has required removal of such fluid or hypoalbuminemia; or Hepatic Encephalopathy; or High levels (2.5 mg per 100 ml. or more) of bilirubin in the blood on repeat exams for at least three (3) months; or Confirmed diagnosis of chronic liver disease with ascites as mentioned in #3 above, or with serum bilirubin levels as mentioned in #5 above, or with inflammation of the liver or cellular death of tissue within the liver for at least three (3) months. This is demonstrated by a blood test showing abnormal prothrombin time (a measure of how long it takes blood to clot) as well as blood tests indicating abnormal levels of other liver enzymes. Disability claimants must also have a medical diagnosis of Hepatitis which is supported by a liver biopsy in addition to documenting the above requirements. Indiana individuals who are unable to meet this listing based on the above information, may still file for disability benefits in the form of a medical vocational allowance. You may be considered for this medical vocational allowance if your symptoms are severe enough that you are unable to function at work and your condition is … Continued

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September 9, 2011

Social Security Disability Attorney in Indianapolis and Disability Benefits for Affective Disorders

Indiana Social Security disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis is an experienced attorney who represents individuals with their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim. In his disability claims experience, he has represented individuals with a variety of disabling conditions.  Whether you suffer from a mental disorder or a physical disability, if you are unable to work due to this disabling condition or a combination of disabling conditions, you may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits. Attorney Scott D. Lewis often finds himself representing a disability claimant who suffers from an affective disorder.  An affective disorder is a disabling condition which is characterized by a disturbance of mood.  Mood is an emotion that generally involves depression or elation. In order to qualify for Social Security disability benefits for an affective disorder, an individual is required to suffer from an affective disorder considered severe.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) outlines the qualifying criteria in the “Listing of Impairments,” Section 12.04 Affective Disorder. In this listing, it states that a disability claimant must meet the criteria by proving that one of the following conditions is persistent (either continuous or intermittent): Depressive syndrome characterized by at least four (4) of the following:   a. Anhedonia or pervasive loss of interest in almost all activities; or b. Appetite disturbance with change in weight; or c. Sleep disturbance; or d. Psychomotor agitation or retardation; or e. Decreased energy; or f. Feelings of guilt or worthlessness; or g. Difficulty concentrating or thinking; or h. Thoughts of suicide; or i. Hallucinations, delusions, or paranoid thinking; or 2. Manic syndrome characterized by at least three of the following: a. Hyperactivity; or b. Pressure of speech; or c. Flight of ideas; or d. Inflated self-esteem; or e. Decreased need for sleep; or f. Easy distractibility; or g. Involvement in activities that have a high probability … Continued

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September 1, 2011

Indiana Social Security Disability Benefits for Tinnitus

Indiana residents that experience tinnitus often wonder if they qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Depending on the severity of tinnitus, some individuals may qualify to receive disability benefits.  People with tinnitus may experience hearing a sound within their ear or head when there is no external physical sound present. Some individuals describe the sound as the following: hissing, chirping, buzzing, roaring, or high-pitched ring. Tinnitus is a very common problem that affects 10-17% of the general population. Approximately 44 million Americans experience tinnitus to some degree and is more prevalent in elderly people. Although some people find tinnitus is just a nuisance. Others may find it is a life-altering condition. My tinnitus is so severe that is causes me to be unable to work; do I qualify for Social Security disability benefits?  Many individuals find their tinnitus so severe that it interferes with their ability to function daily activities including, but not limited to, work.  These individuals may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits if he/she is able to prove the severity of the condition and how it affects their daily life.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) does mention under  their “Listing of Impairment” Section 2.00 Special Senses and Speech that tinnitus is part of vestibular disorders. At the law office of Scott D. Lewis, Indianapolis Social Security lawyer Scott Lewis has represented disability claimants with tinnitus.  In his experience, establishing and obtaining good medical records that support the claimant’s disability claim may be key to winning your disability claim.  Individuals with tinnitus may benefit by continuing to visit their treating physician and maintaining treatment as prescribed by their physician.  Tinnitus combined with other disabling conditions may be considered in your disability claim.  Attorney Scott D. Lewis offers a free consultation to individuals seeking disability benefits from the Social Security Administration.

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August 30, 2011

Weight-Bearing Joint Disability and Social Security Disability Benefits

Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis is an experienced disability attorney who represents Indiana individuals with their Social Security disability claims. Individuals who suffer from weight-bearing joint disabilities may find themselves unable to work due to this disabling condition.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes weight-bearing joint disorders in their “Listing of Impairments.”  The SSA’s “Listing of Impairments” is simply a list of impairments that the SSA uses to define and evaluate disability.  Under Section 1.00 Muscuskeletal System, you may find how the SSA evaluates weight-bearing joint conditions in order to qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Weight-bearing joints, also known as “load-bearing” joints, are located in the knees, hands, hips, feet, and spine. An individual may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits if he/she experience major dysfunction of a joint and the individual has one or more major weight-bearing joint issues causing the individual to have limited ability to walk, independently initiate, sustain, or complete activities. Individuals suffering from a weight-bearing joint disability may experience insufficient lower extremity function preventing him/her to have independent ambulation without the use of a hand-held assistive device(s).  Individuals that use hand-held assistance, such as a walker, two crutches or two canes, may find that they are limited with both of their upper body extremities. Therefore, not only having limitations with their lower extremities, but also limiting the use of their upper body extremities. According to the SSA, an individual who is able to ambulate effectively must be capable of sustaining a reasonable walking pace over a sufficient distance to be able to carry out activities of daily living. They must have the ability to travel without companion assistance to and from a place of employment or school. Some examples given by the SSA of ineffective ambulation may include, but are not limited to, the following: the inability to walk without the … Continued

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