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May 3, 2011

Can I Get Social Security Disability Benefits If I Am On Oxygen?

Is being on oxygen a sure winner in Social Security disability cases?  In Indianapolis Social Security disability Scott Lewis’ experience, there are many variables involved in a person needing to be on oxygen and their ability to work.  The thought of dragging around an oxygen tank in the workplace may sound far fetched to some, but at times Vocational Experts (job expert) may say there are occupations that a person can do while still needing the aid of oxygen.  Indiana disability lawyer Scott Lewis believes if you are attempting to get Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits because you need the aid of oxygen, you should first look to see if your medical condition meets one of the listings in Social Security Administration’s (SSA’s) “Listing of Impairments”. Indiana disability appeals claimants with respiratory problems may want to look to SSA’s Listing 3.00 concerning the respiratory system.  While this listing covers various respiratory issues, those with severe breathing problems may want to consider Listing 3.02 Chronic Pulmonary Insufficiency.  This Listing contains various tables comparing FEV1 levels and an individual’s height and other data to determine eligibility for Social Security disability benefits.  To determine your FEV1 level, Mr. Lewis suggests you contact your treating physician to arrange appropriate testing.  After looking at this particular listing and some people find it confusing, but do not feel alone.  Much of the material in the “Listing of Impairments” can be confusing and you may find it in your best interest to contact your physician or a qualified Social Security disability lawyr to sort through this information. If you do not meet or equal a listing,will you lose your Indiana Social Security disability appeal?  Not always.  It may depend on how often you are short of breath, experience chest pain, find yourself fatigued, and many other … Continued

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April 28, 2011

Your Indiana Social Security Disability Appeal and Radiculopathy

Indianapolis disability attorney Scott D. Lewis represents disability claimants with many disabling conditions including those suffering from radiculopathy. Potential disability clients often call his office who suffer from radiculopathy, but are unsure whether this condition qualifies them for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. When your disabling condition begins to prevent you from performing substantial gainful activity (SGA), and you find yourself unable to provide for yourself and/or your family the way you used to, it may be time to inquire about Social Security disability benefits. Radiculopathy is a condition that is recognized by the Social Security Administration (SSA) as a disabling condition under the SSA’s Listing of Impairment’s Spinal Disorders.  If you are considering applying for Social Security disability benefits, the first step is to look through the SSA’s “Listing of Impairments” to see if you have a qualifying disability. The SSA publishes these listings as a resource for those looking to receive Social Security disability benefits.  These listing are used by the SSA to decide whether or not a claimant’s disability meets the Social Security Administration’s standards for disability and whether the disability claimant should be awarded or denied disability benefits. Radiculopathy is defined under listing 1.04 Disorders of the Spine, Section A. Carefully evaluate this listing and discuss with your physician about whether or not he/she feels as though you meet or equal the criteria to be found disabled. Indiana Social Security disability attorney Scott D. Lewis often sends his client’s physicians a list of questions in hopes that they will complete these questionnaires in such a way as to show the client does indeed meet the listing, making it easier for Social Security to find the claimant disabled. If it is determined that the disability claimant does not meet or equal the listing (1.04 Disorders of the Spine, Section A) which defines radiculopathy and its … Continued

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April 7, 2011

Can I Get Social Security Disability For Coronary Artery Disease?

Indiana disability attorney Scott Lewis seems to get more and more calls from his Indiana neighbors asking the above question.  This may be due to medical advances being able to diagnose coronary artery disease at an early stage or perhaps simply more individuals are experiencing this cardiovascular impairment.  There are many factors that go into a finding of disabled for coronary artery disease and if you are pursuing an Indiana Social Security disability claim you need to be aware of what documentation you may need to win your disability claim. Indianapolis disability attorney Scott Lewis has seen many clients denied disability benefits at the initial and reconsideration levels when they have already underwent numerous medical procedures including bypass surgeries, stent placement, and various other procedures.  Some individuals have experienced heart attacks and still find themselves pulling a denial from their mailbox.  Many individuals not familiar with heart problems may be shocked to find a finding of disability is not a sure thing when an individual suffers from this type of impairment.  The truth is, the Social Security Administration (SSA) believes you can recover from these types of cardiovascular impairments and go on to perform substantial gainful activity. How can you win an Indiana Social Security disability claim for Social Security Disability (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits?  One of the keys may be good solid comprehensive medical records.  Statements from your treating physician, preferably a specialist in the cardiovascular area, stating your restrictions and inability to work can be beneficial.  One way to win your Indiana Social Security disability claim is to meet or equal Social Security’s Listing of Impairments under Section 4.00 for the Cardiovascular System.  The Listing of Impairments can be very rigid in their guidelines, and many Indiana disability claimants find that they don’t precisely meet … Continued

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April 4, 2011

Indianapolis Disability Lawyer Scott Lewis Thoughts On Seizures

Social Security disability claimants experiencing seizures often find themselves denied their disability benefits during the claims process.  While most Americans may think a person suffering from seizures would be a sure thing in obtaining Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments, the Social Security Administration many times has a different opinion. Indiana residents suffering from seizures due to epilepsy or other causes are usually surprised to find at times it can be difficult to prove their claim is valid.  Seizures can be unpredictable and many times the only medical evidence contained in a Social Security disability claimant’s file is self reporting documentation.  Many times, the seizure is over by the time an individual is seen by a medical professional.  Other issues can include the severity and type of seizure the individual has experienced. Obviously, the intensity and severity of a seizure can vary from person to person.  Some individuals may experience convulsive seizures while others experience non-convulsive seizures.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) will probably be interested in knowing the duration and the cause of the seizures.  Another major aspect of a disability claim for a seizure disorder is the after effects of a seizure.  Many individuals suffering from a seizure disorder report memory problems, and extreme fatigue following a seizure. The need to recuperate after a seizure for a lengthy period of time may prohibit an individual from maintaining full time employment. Indiana Social Security disability claimants not complying with taking prescribed medication to reduce or eliminate seizures may also jeopardize their chances of winning their Indiana Social Security disability claim.  In most cases, if medication eliminates the disabling condition you are experiencing then you will be found not disabled by the Social Security Administration.  Indianapolis Social Security lawyer Scott Lewis encourages his clients to adhere to … Continued

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March 28, 2011

What is the Social Security Administration’s Medical Listing of Impairments?

Indianapolis Attorney Scott D. Lewis practices Social Security disability law throughout the state of Indiana. He represents disability claimants with their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim. Most individuals who apply for SSDI or SSI benefits have no idea what disability criteria the Social Security Administration (SSA) uses to determine if they are disabled. The SSA determines if an individual is disabled according to the rules and regulations governing Social Security disability and use a “Listing of Impairments” also known as the “blue book” to determine if an individual will meet or exceed the SSA’s definition of disability. What is the Social Security Administration’s Medical “Listing of Impairments”?  This medical listing referred to as the blue book is a list of impairments that Congress has defined to be disabling. This disability handbook contains fourteen (14) major body system sections that address a list of Social Security disability impairments considered to be severe enough to prevent an individual from engaging in substantial gainful activity (SGA). The major body systems addressed within the blue book are as follows: Musculoskeletal System, Special Senses and Speech, Respiratory System, Cardiovascular System, Digestive System, Genitourinary Impairments, Hematological Disorders, Skin Disorders, Endocrine System, Impairments that Affect Multiple Body Systems, Neurological, Mental Disorders, Malignant Neoplastic Diseases, and Immune System Disorders. Within each of the above listings, Social Security defines the criteria needed to meet the listing in which disability is defined.  Indiana disability claimants may wonder what impairments they will find in the Social Security List of Impairments.  The “Listing of Impairments” contains a list of disabling conditions for each major body system.  For example, if you are disabled due to a spinal disorder, you must meet the criteria set forth in the section of the listing dealing with Musculoskeletal System.  In Section 1.00 Musculoskeletal System, … Continued

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March 19, 2011

Your Indiana Social Security Disability Appeal and Cerebral Palsy

Scott D. Lewis is an Indianapolis disability lawyer who sees a variety of disabling conditions and cerebral palsy is no exception.  It is not uncommon for potential clients to call his office and ask how severe their disabling condition must be in order to be eligible for either Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. When should you inquire about your Indiana Social Security disability benefits for cerebral palsy or any other disabling condition?  In most cases, it is when your condition prevents you from performing substantial gainful activity.  In other words, apply for disability benefits when you find yourself unable to take care of yourself and/or your family due to a disabling condition or combination of disabling conditions. Cerebral palsy is recognized by the Social Security Administration (SSA) as a disabling condition if it meets certain criteria.  To start with an Indiana disability claimant may want to turn to the Social Security Administration’s “Listing of Impairments”.  This publication outlines various disabling conditions the SSA will consider in making a favorable or unfavorable decision when deciding if your condition meets or equals certain standards.  The Social Security Administration evaluates cerebral palsy under section11.00 Neurological Impairments and more specifically 11.07 for cerebral palsy. Examining the criteria needed to qualify for this impairment while at the same time taking a close look at your treating physician’s medical records may help you determine if you do indeed meet or equal the criteria needed to be determined disabled. Indiana Social Security disability attorney Scott D. Lewis often sends a list of questions to his Indiana disability claimant’s physician(s) in hopes they may complete these forms in such a way it verifies that his client meets the listing making it easier for the Social Security Administration to find you disabled. What … Continued

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February 18, 2011

Social Security Disability Benefits for Degenerative Disc Disease

In Indianapolis disability attorney Scott Lewis’ experience, one of the most common disabling conditions his clients share is problems with their backs and necks. Disabling conditions in this area can include, but are not limited to scoliosis, herniated disc, spinal stenosis, sciatica, spondylolisthesis, arthritis, and degenerative disc disease. These conditions can cause severe chronic pain that may make it unbearable to maintain full or part time employment. One of the most common types of back pain is due to degenerative disc disease.  As we age, it is not uncommon for this condition to occur.  Causes of degenerative disc disease may include outer layer tears in the disc and fluid loss in the disc.  Depending on the location of the disc or discs affected usually dictates where a person feels the pain. The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes degenerative disc disease in its Listing of Impairments under Listing 1.04 Disorders of the Spine.  It is important for Indiana disability appeals claimants to note that they do not have to meet or equal this listing in order to receive Indiana Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Securit Income (SSI) benefits.  The Social Security Administration may also consider an individual’s physical residual functional capacity.  Physical residual functional capacity refers to the limitations you may have considering items such as your inability to stand, sit, walk, and lift causing you to be unable to maintain employment.  The SSA may also consider the pain the claimant experiences when deciding if they are able to maintain employment. In Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyer Scott Lewis’ experience, good medical records are key to winning your Indiana Social Security disability claim.  Imaging tests such as x-rays and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI’s) may be critical in winning your disability claim.  It is also important to let your treating physician know the … Continued

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February 7, 2011

Social Security Disability Benefits for Claimants with Depression

Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyer Scott Lewis is an experienced attorney representing Social Security disability claimants.  Many of his Indiana Social Security disability clients suffer mental disorders such as depression.  Often, disability claimants with depression do not have sufficient medical documentation to back up their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim. Some disability claimants lack health insurance causing insufficient medical documentation.  Mr. Lewis advises his clients to investigate in the low income health programs or programs offered to uninsured individuals located in the Indianapolis area such as Wishard’s Health Advantage program.  Some other reasons disability claimants with depression may lack medical documentation supporting their claim is because a claimant may not be seeing doctors because they are ashamed of their disabling condition so they don’t seek the medical attention that they need from a mental health professional.  Having a lack of medical history to support your disability claim may ultimately cause you to lose your case. The Social Security Administration (SSA) approves SSDI or SSI claims based on medical evidence, so if you are suffering from depression, it is important to seek out the opinion of a qualified mental health professional such as a psychiatrist or psychologist who will provide documentation to back up your claim.  It may be helpful that these professionals need to identify that: you are indeed suffering from clinical depression; and your depression significantly interferes with your ability to work. If your mental health physician has prescribed you medication to help you with your depressive state, the SSA may frown upon your lack of compliance if you do continue to take your medications.  Medications such as anti-depressants may not enough to prove your case.  A psychiatrist can be most effective in helping you to demonstrate the following to the SSA: The individual is depressed and suffering from a history of mental health issues related to his/her … Continued

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February 1, 2011

Anxiety Disorder and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Benefits

Are you an Indiana resident unable to work because you are suffering from anxiety disorder?  Anxiety disorders are the most common of emotional disorders.  Anxiety disorder affects more than 20 million Americans each year.  This is approximately one out of nine people suffering from anxiety disorder.   Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis has numerous disability clients suffering from mental health disorders such as anxiety disorder.  Disability claimants may experience one or several symptoms associated with anxiety such as: uncontrollable obsessive thoughts, overwhelming feelings of panic & fear, recurring nightmares, and painful, intrusive memories. Physical symptoms of this emotional disorder include, but are not limited to: sweating, increased heart rate, nausea, shaking, muscle tension, and other uncomfortable physical reactions. Anxiety disorder differs from normal feelings of nervousness, as the symptoms often occur for no apparent reason and do not go away. These alarming reactions can make everyday experiences sources of potential terror. Anxiety disorder can be characterized as one of the following five types:  Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Social Phobia, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Generalized Anxiety Disorder is defined by at least six months of a constant state of worry or tension and is not related to a specific event.  A person with Panic Disorder experiences repeated, unprovoked attacks of anxiety or terror lasting up to 10 minutes. Disability claimants with Social Phobias are irrational, involuntary, and overwhelming fears that lead a person to avoid common objects, social events, or situations. Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is characterized by recurrent, persistent, and intrusive impulses or thoughts that the person feels can be controlled by performing repetitive behaviors. Indiana disability claimants with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) typically experience PTSD because they were a part of or witnessed a traumatic event or a series of events which resulted in severe stress symptoms lasting more than one month. How does … Continued

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November 12, 2010

Stroke and Your Indiana Social Security Disability Benefits

Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyer Scott Lewis often finds himself talking to Indiana residents wondering if they can receive disability benefits because they have experienced a stroke.  Disability attorney Scott Lewis usually finds the stroke itself is not to be the reason the individual cannot work, but the effects afterward.  Many Social Security disability claimants find themselves unable to remember things and complain of short and long term memory loss after experiencing a stroke.  Another problem may include the inability to function physically as they did prior to having a stroke. One major issue may involve that to be entitled to Indiana Social Security disability benefits an individual must be disabled for twelve months or be expected to be disabled for twelve months, or the disability is expected to result in death. This is called the “durational requirement”.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) could argue that the residual effects of your stroke may go away.  It is difficult to determine if this is true, so good medical evidence may be the key to proving your disability will persist. Through good medical records, including physical and psychological records, an Indiana Social Security disability claimant should try to prove they are unable to return to their past work, and are unable to perform any other jobs that exist in the economy.  This may be accomplished by showing that the Indiana Social Security disability claimant has such a reduced physical or mental capacity that they are unable to perform substantial gainful activity (SGA).  Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott Lewis also attempts to categorize his disability clients into a listing in the Listing of Impairments issued by the Social Security Administration.  

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