June 23, 2010

Indiana Residents Claiming Disability for Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia

Many disability applicants wonder if they can receive disability benefits for panic disorders and agoraphobia. Those suffering from these disorders often find everyday life difficult to live. Agoraphobia is commonly known as an anxiety disorder revolving around fear. Agoraphobia can be fear of public places, fear of large crowds, or the presence of people in general. At its simplest definition it is the fear of experiencing anxiety or panic attacks in public places. Many agoraphobics most often have attacks when they feel insecure or trapped.

The cause of agoraphobia is still unknown but women are more often diagnosed with it than men. People that abuse alcohol and other drugs also have an increased risk more than people that do not. The onset of agoraphobia can come at any time in a person’s life but is most common starting in the teen years to early twenties. Agoraphobics tend to isolate themselves so that they do not have panic attacks. If the condition gets severe enough it could include never leaving home; things like work, shopping, or school can be nearly impossible. Even though agoraphobia is a psychological disorder, many times it causes physical symptoms. A few examples are chest pains, difficulty breathing, or dizziness. While it is often thought there is no way to prevent agoraphobia there are treatments. Treatment consists mainly of medications and psychotherapy. If treatment does not start early, agoraphobics’ phobias may become worse over time.

The Social Security Administration defines a disability as something which satisfies both of the following conditions: you must not be able to do substantial work because of your medical condition or conditions, AND the medical condition or conditions must have lasted or are expected to last at least one year, or be expected to result in your death. If you believe that your agoraphobia, panic disorder, anxiety disorder, or any other disability meets these two qualifications and meets other disability requirements, contact Scott D. Lewis, Attorney at Law. Scott D. Lewis is a 100% disabled veteran who is located in downtown Indianapolis. Contact Scott D. Lewis if you believe your psychological disorder, or any other disability including diabetes, scoliosis, cancer, or arthritis qualifies you for either Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Social Security Disability Attorney Scott D. Lewis may be able to help with your claim, just call 317-423-8888.

Filed under:Qualifying Disabilities and Impairments
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