May 13, 2011

Parkinson’s Disease and Social Security Disability Benefits

Indiana individuals applying for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits may be surprised to find they have been denied benefits when they have a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease.  Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott D. Lewis does see individuals with this disorder turned down throughout the disability process and it could be for a variety of reasons. Some of the reasons can include, but are not limited to:

  • The Social Security Administration (SSA) simply made an error in denying the claim.  Perhaps they were unable to obtain critical evidence documenting your disabling condition. In Indianapolis disability lawyer Scott Lewis’ experience, this scenario can be very common.  When Mr. Lewis prepares for a case, he strives to ensure all of these crucial medical findings are submitted to the Indiana Social Security Administration.  Also, Mr. Lewis attempts to get your physicians to fill out forms verifying how your disabling condition fits the Social Security Administration’s requirements.
  • It could be that the SSA has determined your condition is not severe enough.  To meet the severity level for Parkinson’s disease (or known as Parkinsonian Syndrome) by the SSA you must meet or be equal to Listing 11.06 in its Listing of impairments.

If your condition does not meet the above referenced listing, does your physical or mental residual functional capacity prevent you from working?  In other words, because of the Parkinson’s disease are you are limited in the areas of standing, walking, sitting, lifting, and concentrating among other areas preventing you from performing substantial gainful activity (SGA).  Other factors such as your age, education, and prior work experience may also be important factors in a finding of disability.

Also, it should go without saying but it is important if you are able to work or exactly how much you are able to work.  The above information may be meaningless if you are currently working and making over a certain amount of income determined by the Social Security Administration.
What should you do if you are unable to work and have been denied Indiana Social Security disability benefits and you have Parkinson’s disease?  If you have a valid claim, you should appeal your denial and move forward in the Social Security disability process.  Remember, there are time constraints in filing your Social Security disability appeals paperwork.

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