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May 5, 2015

Asperger’s Syndrome and Obtaining Social Security Disability Benefits

Often, my blog topics reflect certain disabling conditions or Social Security disability issues that seem to be becoming more prevalent in my practice.  Asperger’s Syndrome is definitely one of these conditions; I represent many children and adults who have been given this diagnosis. Of course, the most recent DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which was released in May of 2013) no longer contains a diagnosis of “Asperger’s Syndrome”; the disorder, along with other disorders such Pervasive Development Disorder NOS, is now included under the diagnosis of “Autism Spectrum Disorder.”  As people with Asperger’s and their families know, it doesn’t matter what it’s called; the symptoms and limitations remain. People with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder typically have social communication and interaction deficits and restrictive, repetitive patterns of behavior.  These symptoms often interfere with an adult’s ability to work or with a child’s ability to function at an age-appropriate developmental level.  If you or your child have these symptoms, you could be eligible for benefits under Social Security’s Disability Insurance (SSDI) program or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. Whether you are an adult or a child on the autism spectrum, the first way the Social Security Administration (SSA) assesses whether your impairment is disabling under its rules is by referring to the entry for “autistic disorder and other pervasive developmental disorders” in its Listing of Impairments.  The relevant listing for adults is Listing 12.10; the relevant listing for children is Listing 112.10.  First, Social Security will determine whether you meet the diagnostic criteria for an autism spectrum diagnosis.  Next, it will evaluate how severely your symptoms affect your ability to function.  For adults, this means an adjudicator will determine how markedly your symptoms impair your activities of daily living, your social functioning, and your ability to maintain … Continued

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December 19, 2011

Asperger’s Syndrome And Filing An Indiana Social Security Disability Claim

Believe it or not even individuals suffering from severe Asperger’s Syndrome can find themselves denied their disability benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA).  Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott D. Lewis has experience with this type of claim, and often finds himself talking to families shaking their heads wondering why they have been denied.  Many valid initial claims are denied by the SSA, but the reality is that many of theses same claims are found favorable further in the appeals process. Asperger’s Syndrome can range widely in its severity.  While one individual may suffer from very mild symptoms another individual may be very severe.  Asperger’s Syndrome may be hard to detect in very young children, but many times symptoms are noticed as children enter kindergarten and start interacting with their peers.  The symptoms of Asperger’s Syndrome may vary from individual to individual but some common symptoms can include but are not limited to: Problems with social interaction.  This usually includes the inability to identify social cues. Unusual facial expressions and may attempt to avoid eye contact. Heightened sensitivity to textures, tastes, sounds, and light. Repeating words in a formal manner, and also may talk excessively about one subject. Some individuals may find a change or routine very disturbing. In Indianapolis disability attorney Scott Lewis’ experience some individuals symptoms suffering from Asperger’s Syndrome may not be easily detected in a brief interaction.  It is usually very apparent after an individual spends some time with the person and then understands these symptoms are continuous.  When attempting to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for Asperger’s Syndrome good medical records are generally the key to a favorable outcome.  A long standing relationship with a psychiatrist or therapist with a clear diagnosis supported by treatment records may … Continued

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June 22, 2011

Social Security Disability Benefits for Aspergers Syndrome

Indiana disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis has helped individuals win Social Security disability claims involving Aspergers Syndrome when they found themselves initially denied.  Many Indiana residents and their families are shocked when they find themselves with a notice of denial when they know this type of impairment can create a huge impact in some areas of functioning. Most of the individuals Mr. Lewis sees with Aspergers Syndrome are children and while there are many symptoms associated with Aspergers Syndrome some of the more common symptoms include: Difficulties with social interaction Repetitive behaviors and problems accepting changes in routines Hypersensitivity to textures, tastes, and sounds. Avoidance eye contact Extreme focus on one area of interest The above symptoms may vary from individual to individual and can have varying degrees of severity.  It is important to note,  an individual trained in the appropriate medical field can usually better assist in deciding what symptoms are generally attributed to Aspergers Syndrome. Indianapolis disability attorney Scott Lewis has talked with families who have an individual with Asperger’s Syndrome and understands the effects it may have on academic performance, social interaction, and the ability to perform work like activity.  It is important to remember the Social Security Administration (SSA) does recognize Aspergers Syndrome as a disabling condition.  It may be necessary to appeal your denied Indiana Social security disability claim in order to get the benefits granted that you deserve.

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