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September 9, 2011

Social Security Disability Attorney in Indianapolis and Disability Benefits for Affective Disorders

Indiana Social Security disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis is an experienced attorney who represents individuals with their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim. In his disability claims experience, he has represented individuals with a variety of disabling conditions.  Whether you suffer from a mental disorder or a physical disability, if you are unable to work due to this disabling condition or a combination of disabling conditions, you may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits. Attorney Scott D. Lewis often finds himself representing a disability claimant who suffers from an affective disorder.  An affective disorder is a disabling condition which is characterized by a disturbance of mood.  Mood is an emotion that generally involves depression or elation. In order to qualify for Social Security disability benefits for an affective disorder, an individual is required to suffer from an affective disorder considered severe.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) outlines the qualifying criteria in the “Listing of Impairments,” Section 12.04 Affective Disorder. In this listing, it states that a disability claimant must meet the criteria by proving that one of the following conditions is persistent (either continuous or intermittent): Depressive syndrome characterized by at least four (4) of the following:   a. Anhedonia or pervasive loss of interest in almost all activities; or b. Appetite disturbance with change in weight; or c. Sleep disturbance; or d. Psychomotor agitation or retardation; or e. Decreased energy; or f. Feelings of guilt or worthlessness; or g. Difficulty concentrating or thinking; or h. Thoughts of suicide; or i. Hallucinations, delusions, or paranoid thinking; or 2. Manic syndrome characterized by at least three of the following: a. Hyperactivity; or b. Pressure of speech; or c. Flight of ideas; or d. Inflated self-esteem; or e. Decreased need for sleep; or f. Easy distractibility; or g. Involvement in activities that have a high probability … Continued

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September 1, 2011

Indiana Social Security Disability Benefits for Tinnitus

Indiana residents that experience tinnitus often wonder if they qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Depending on the severity of tinnitus, some individuals may qualify to receive disability benefits.  People with tinnitus may experience hearing a sound within their ear or head when there is no external physical sound present. Some individuals describe the sound as the following: hissing, chirping, buzzing, roaring, or high-pitched ring. Tinnitus is a very common problem that affects 10-17% of the general population. Approximately 44 million Americans experience tinnitus to some degree and is more prevalent in elderly people. Although some people find tinnitus is just a nuisance. Others may find it is a life-altering condition. My tinnitus is so severe that is causes me to be unable to work; do I qualify for Social Security disability benefits?  Many individuals find their tinnitus so severe that it interferes with their ability to function daily activities including, but not limited to, work.  These individuals may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits if he/she is able to prove the severity of the condition and how it affects their daily life.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) does mention under  their “Listing of Impairment” Section 2.00 Special Senses and Speech that tinnitus is part of vestibular disorders. At the law office of Scott D. Lewis, Indianapolis Social Security lawyer Scott Lewis has represented disability claimants with tinnitus.  In his experience, establishing and obtaining good medical records that support the claimant’s disability claim may be key to winning your disability claim.  Individuals with tinnitus may benefit by continuing to visit their treating physician and maintaining treatment as prescribed by their physician.  Tinnitus combined with other disabling conditions may be considered in your disability claim.  Attorney Scott D. Lewis offers a free consultation to individuals seeking disability benefits from the Social Security Administration.

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August 23, 2011

Neuropathy and Social Security Disability Benefits

Indiana Social Security disability claimants suffering from neuropathy may find themselves denied disability benefits in the early stages of the disability claims process. Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott Lewis has represented numerous of his Indiana neighbors who are unable to work due to neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy stems from changes to the peripheral nervous system.  Damage to the peripheral nervous system can result in interruption of  important communications needed in the body. In Indiana disability lawyer Scott Lewis’ experience, the majority of his disability clients complain of numbness and/or tingling in their feet and/or hands.  Many individuals also report the inability to feel hot and cold sensations.  These are some more common symptoms and in severe cases the symptoms may become even more extreme. There are numerous causes of neuropathy.  Some identifiable causes of neuropathy can include diabetes, auto immune diseases, and alcoholism, to name a few.  If you are experiencing neuropathy type symptoms you should consult a qualified physician to ensure you receive proper medical treatment.  It is reported even physicians may have a difficult time pinpointing the origin of neuropathy symptoms. If you find yourself unable to work due to peripheral neuropathy because you are unable to sit, stand, or walk for lengths of time you may be eligible for Social Security disability benefits.  You can contact Indianapolis disability attorney Scott Lewis and his staff for a free consultation.

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August 16, 2011

Digestive Disorders and Social Security Disability Claims

Many individuals suffering from a digestive disorder find that this disorder can take them away from work indefinitely. Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott D. Lewis assists individuals with digestive disorders with their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim.  The Social Security Administration’s (SSA) “Listing of Impairments” addresses the criteria for a variety of digestive system disorders in section 5.00 Digestive System.  Specifically, the following digestive orders can be found under this listing: 5.02 Gastroinntestinal hemorrhaging from any cause, requiring blood transfusion 5.05 Chronic Liver Disease 5.06 Imflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) 5.07 Short Bowel Sydrome (SBS) 5.08 Weight Loss due to any digestive disorder 5.09 Liver transplant Meeting the Listings for digestive disorders may be very difficult. However, individuals may also be awarded SSDI or SSI benefits if they suffer from a combination of health problems while they do not meet the listing, in combination prevent them from being able to perform substantial gainful employment. The “Listings of Impairments” are designed to award Social Security disability benefits to disability claimants who are clearly severely ill.  The Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) at a hearing can determine that a person, while not meeting a specific disability listing, has health problems severe enough to award the claimant disability benefits. Individuals suffering from a digestive disorder may experience the following symptoms or side effects: Development of allergies due to compromised immunity Abdominal pain Indigetion Heartburn Difficulty swallowing Diarhhea or constipation Chest pain Fatigue Bladder or bowel changes Unexplained weight loss Bloating and painful gas Nausea and vomiting Weakened immune system As stated above, being approved for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for a digestive disorder may be difficult. In order to successfully win your claim, it’s important to prove to the SSA what is wrong with you and how the digestive disorder negatively affects your daily life. In … Continued

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August 11, 2011

Affective Disorders and Indiana Social Security Disability Benefits

Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis assists disabled individuals with their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim.  In his disability law experience, Attorney Lewis represents disability claimants with a variety of disabling conditions including physical disabilities, mental disabilities, or a combination of conditions.  Among the variety of disabling conditions, Mr. Lewis has experience in representing individuals with affective disorders such as depression. What is affective disorders?  Affective disorders are mental disorders that are characterized by extreme mood changes in a person.  Affective disorders may either be manic or depressive.  Manic affective disorders symptoms may include irritable or elevated moods with pressured speech, inflated self-esteem and hyperactivity.  Depressive affective disorders symptoms may include episodes of dejected mood with sleep disturbance, agitation, disinterest in life, and feelings of worthlessness or guilt.  Some individuals experience a combination of the two. Individuals with an affective disorder may or may not have psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, or other loss of contact with reality. How does an individual with an affective disorder qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits?  According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), individuals suffering from an affective disorder if he/she meets the requirements stated in the SSA’s “Listing of Impairments.”  In section 12.04 Affective Disorder, the SSA characterizes affective disorders by a disturbance of mood, accompanied by a full or partial manic or depressive syndrome. Mood refers to a prolonged emotion that colors the whole psychic life; it generally involves either depression or elation. Per Section 12.04, the required level of severity for affective disorders is met when the requirements in both A and B are satisfied, or when the requirements in C are satisfied. These requirements are as follows:  A.  Medically documented persistence, either continuous or intermittent, of one of the following: 1.  Depressive syndrome characterized by at least four of the following: Anhedonia or … Continued

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August 8, 2011

Heart Problems and Indiana Social Security Disability Benefits

Are you an Indiana disability claimant unable to work due to heart problems?  Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis represents those individuals with disabling conditions such as heart disease in their disability benefits claim.  Indianapolis disability claimants who suffer from heart conditions may qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits if he/she meets the Social Security Administration’s (SSA’s) Listing of Impairments.  In Listing 4.00 Cardiovascular System, the SSA outlines the requirements in order for an individual suffering from a heart condition to qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits. Heart disease, also known as cardiovascular disease, describes a large spectrum of disorders that affect the heart muscle and/or blood vessels. The primary cause of death, in men and women worldwide, is problems with the heart and blood vessels. Coronary artery disease (or atherosclerosis) is the result of plaque building up in the arteries.  This condition can lead to a heart attack, heart failure, high blood pressure, angina, and/or stroke. Congenital heart disease, heart infection, heart valve disease, and cardiomyopathy are examples of heart problems not related to arterial build-up. Strokes and heart attacks can cause serious physical limitations and are one of the most common causes of disability today. Damage to the heart or blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients throughout the body can cause any number of debilitating symptoms, including: Arrhythmia Chest Pain and Pressure Muscle Weakness Stomach Pain Fatigue Nausea and Vomiting Lightheadedness/Fainting Dizziness Anxiety Blood Clots Shortness of Breath Upper Body Pain Sweating Heart Palpitations/Rapid Heart Rate Heart and blood vessel problems result from damage done to the cardiovascular system, either through congenital defects or lifestyle and environmental factors. Pressure build-up in the arteries due to the presence of plaque restricts the blood flow to bodily organs and tissues. Plaque build-up … Continued

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August 4, 2011

Social Security Disability Benefits for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Indianapolis disability attorney Scott D. Lewis represents individuals with a variety of mental and/or physical disabling conditions.  Included in these impairments is those suffering with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).  Indiana residents with OCD may find themselves qualifying for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  OCD is a disabling condition that may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits under the Social Security Administrations “Listing of Impairments,” Section 12.00 Mental Disorder.  OCD is specifically identified under section 12.06 Anxiety-related disorders.  Refer to the SSA’s website for criteria requirements.  What is Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?  OCD is a mental disorder when an individual worries, doubts or superstitious beliefs become excessive.  OCD is a condition in which the brain cannot let go of a certain thought, and therefore, it makes the patient overly anxious or worried about even the most menial aspects of daily life.  OCD sufferers have difficulty in controlling his or her worries, anxieties, or urges. Many times patients with OCD do not recognize the severity of their condition until it is either too late to treat, deal with the condition as a minor inconvenience, and in many case simply don’t realize what is happening. Unfortunately, OCD may impair a person’s ability to concentrate or communicate with others. As a result, OCD may prevent an individual from being able to work at a reasonable level. Some examples of OCD behavior may include, but is not limited to the following: washing your hands for hours at a time to make sure they remove all germs driving around the block over and over again to make sure an accident didn’t happen turning on and off lights for long periods of time to ensure the lights are turned off Since patients with OCD may either be obsessive and/or compulsive, it is imperative to understand difference. An ‘obsessive’ individual may think about germs too often, or … Continued

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August 1, 2011

Indianapolis Social Security Disability Benefits Due to Amputation

Indiana disability claimants with an amputation filing for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits may be surprised to learn that winning your disability claim based on amputation may not always be easy.  Amputation is defined as the complete severance of an individual’s extremety such as a hand, foot, arm or leg.  Amputation can be due to a medical removal, an injury, or some other form of trauma. Symptoms associated with having an amputated limb vary depending on which body part(s) has been amputated. Amputations of the feet or legs typically affect a person’s ability to walk, bend, climb stairs, and ability to move around. Amputations involving hands and arms typically affect a person’s ability to push, pull, or perform fine motor functions. Although activities for an amputee may be impossible or very difficult, many individuals experience pain around the area of the amputated limb.  Some common medical reasons for amputation may include: Diabetes Gangrene Severe Frostbite Hardened or Embolism of the arteries Raynaud’s disease Buerger’s disease How does an amputee qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits?  As stated above, just being an amputee does not automatically qualify an individual for disability benefits.  As all qualifying disabilities or conditions, in order to qualify for disability benefits for an amputated limb or extremity, an Indiana disability claimant must show that the amputation causes the person to be unable to perform functions that are important in the work place such as lifting, bending, walking, grasping, pushing, and pulling. The difficulty in showing this varies depending on which limbs have been amputated and the type of work (heavy, moderate, light, sedentary) that you have done before or could be expected to perform based on your age, education level and experience. Specifically, the Social Security Administration (SSA) defines the criteria for an individual to qualify for disability benefits because of an amputation in their “Listing of Impairments.”  … Continued

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July 26, 2011

Why Did I Get Denied My Social Security Disability Benefits When the Guy Down the Street Got Them Right Away?

If you only knew how many times Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyers like Scott Lewis have heard this very question. There are many different aspects to a Social Security disability claim and no one case is exactly like another one. While there may not be a clear cut answer to why some Indiana residents find a Social Security disability check in their hands before another person, in Indiana disability attorney Scott Lewis’ experience, there may be a few reasons this can happen and it can include, but is not limited to: Good medical records.  Comprehensive medical records outlining and detailing a disabling medical condition may be the key to a quick favorable outcome in a Social Security disability claim. Prior work experience, age, and education.  In the Social Security Administration’s approval process they determine your ability to work with your disabling condition while looking at age, education, and prior work experience. All disabilities are different and can create different barriers to employment.  While some disabilities may be visually evident, other disabilities like mental disorders may not be visible to the naked eye. The guy down the street may be luckier than you.  That’s right, he may have been evaluated by someone in the Social Security Administration that was more lenient on granting disability claims.  Believe it or not, actual people look at your claim and make a determination. The above are the thoughts and experiences of Scott D. Lewis, and other Social Security disability attorneys or representatives may have different experiences with the Social Security Administration (SSA).  If you have been denied your Indiana Social Security disability benefits and believe it was an unfair decision, contact attorney Scott Lewis for a free case evaluation.

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July 18, 2011

Aneurysm and Social Security Disability Benefits

If you have suffered an aneurysm you may be entitled to Social Security disability benefits. Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott D. Lewis advises clients to go forward with their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim if they are unable to work due to the after effects of an aneurysm. An aneurysm is an inflated blood-filled part of an artery that essentially exists due to a weak portion of the artery wall.  Some of the more common places that can cause severe problems and even death include the heart, brain, and the stomach among other areas of the body. Aneurysm of the aorta or major branches is a qualifying condition for Social Security disability benefits and is listed under section 4.10 in the Listing of Impairments.  For more information relating to the criteria needed to meet or equal this listing one should refer to Social Security’s “blue book”. A ruptured brain aneurysm may result in symptoms including double vision, speech problems, and cognitive issues.  The inability to maintain concentration for a specified amount of time may be enough for an individual to be successful in a Social Security disability claim. If you have suffered an aneurysm and the after effects are preventing work like activity you may be entitled to Social Security disability benefits.  If you have questions concerning your disability benefits you may want to contact the Social Security Administration or an attorney/claimant representative.  Most attorney’s or claimants representatives offer a free case evaluation.

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