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October 16, 2018

Learning Disabilities and Social Security Disability

Whether you are a child or an adult, the Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes learning disabilities as a condition that can pay Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments.  The severity of the condition and its impact on an individual’s functioning can be key factors in receiving benefits. In children’s Social Security disability claims, many aspects of the claim are examined.  These may include, but are not limited to: IQ testing Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) 504 Plans School grades Teacher questionnaires Medical Source Statements from treating physicians Progress notes from treating sources The Listing of Impairments is a guideline published by the SSA that contains specific information related to learning disabilities among other impairments.  The SSA also examines children’s cases under six domains of functioning to determine if a child is functionally equivalent to a listing.  The SSA will look for limitations in the child’s ability to acquire and use information, attend and complete tasks, interact socially, move and manipulate objects, handle their own self-care, or health and physical well-being.  Understanding a child’s Social Security Disability claim can be confusing, as the standard for disability can be different than that of an adult. Adults can also receive Social Security Disability benefits for a learning disability.  The question of whether you can work with a learning disability can be a little tricky to prove to an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ).  If you have worked in the past with your learning disability, the ALJ may wonder how it would currently prevent you from working if your condition has not gotten worse.  Sometimes, employers make “accommodations” for this type of worker.  This might be special treatment that the employer is unwilling to give to other workers.  This may include a job coach, multiple reminders of job duties, leaving work … Continued

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June 8, 2018

Autism and Social Security Disability Benefits

As an Indiana Social Security Disability Attorney, I have noticed an increase in the number of children and young adults diagnosed with Autism.  My office takes great pride in helping these individuals get the benefits they deserve.  Preparing these claims for the Social Security Administration (SSA) usually takes a focused approach to show an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) the severity of this condition.  This blog will briefly outline some of the information I believe is important in proving a claim for an individual who experiences Autism. The good news is that the SSA does recognize Autism as a disabling condition.  In the SSA’s Listing of Impairments, Autism is covered under Listing 112.10 for children and 12.10 for adults.  Using these guidelines, a Social Security disability lawyer can craft arguments to help show the person qualifies for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Many times, a Medical Source Statement may be obtained by a treating source showing that the applicant meets these criteria. Through years of representing those with Autism, I have noticed many common symptoms that are considered severe by the SSA.  These can include, but are not limited to: Social impairments Communication impairments Heightened sensitivity to noise, food, clothing, etc. Repetitive behaviors Other medical conditions linked to Autism This brief list is not intended to be all inclusive because Autism is on a spectrum, and the symptoms may vary in severity and existence from individual to individual. The ability to function may also vary greatly from person to person so, as an attorney representing children or young adults with Autism, it is very important to identify which symptoms are the most severe. When preparing clients for a disability hearing, I try to ask as many questions concerning their disability to find out what aspects … Continued

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March 20, 2018

Children’s Social Security Disability and the Right Lawyer

Not all Social Security Disability lawyers take children’s social security disability cases.  There may be many reasons for this, but one thing is for sure- claims for children are unlike adult disability cases.  Selecting a lawyer with experience handling children’s claims for benefits can make the process smoother for you and your child.  While the Social Security Administration (SSA) evaluates claims for both children and adults, the underlying question is very different.  For adults, that question is “can you work”?  We do not expect children to work, so how does the SSA evaluate them?  This blog will briefly examine how the SSA analyzes children’s benefits claims. The SSA publishes disability guidelines called the Listing of Impairments.  These guidelines set forth specific criteria for evaluating certain impairments to determine if they meet their definition of disability.  Many children do not meet or equal these requirements to receive Supplemental Security Insurance (SSI) benefits.  However, this does not mean that the claim is denied.  The Social Security Administration will then look at six domains to determine if your child is disabled: Acquiring and Using Information Attending and Completing Tasks Interacting and Relating with Others Moving About and Manipulating Objects Caring for Yourself Health and Physical Well-Being A child’s limitations must be considered “marked” in two of these domains or considered “extreme” in one domain to be disabled.  These domains can be a bit tricky, as you can see by their somewhat vague titles.  Some of the domains relate to mental impairments while others relate more to physical impairments.  One part of my job as a Social Security disability attorney is to help the SSA understand how your child’s limitations fit into a domain. A consistent, ongoing, and well-documented treatment record is needed to prove the persistence and severity of your child’s symptoms.  Additionally, … Continued

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January 6, 2016

Finding an Indiana Social Security Disability Lawyer for your Child

If you have had a difficult time finding an attorney to represent you in your child’s claim for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, you may not be alone.  When I speak to new clients in my Indianapolis Social Security disability law practice, they often tell me that many of the Social Security disability attorneys they had consulted simply do not take children’s cases.  Some Administrative Law Judges have told me that children’s SSI cases can be more difficult to win than adult cases.  In my experience, the chances of winning a child’s case are affected by the same factors that affect adults’ cases – we need good treatment records, statements from a treating physician supporting the claimant’s descriptions of his or her symptoms, and good preparation for the hearing.   I take great pride in helping the families of disabled children, and I believe my experience with these cases helps to ensure that my clients have the best chance possible at a favorable outcome. One of the reasons some attorneys may be reluctant to accept children’s cases is that the Social Security Administration (SSA) uses different criteria in evaluating a child’s disability that it does when it evaluates an adult’s impairments.  For example, Social Security has a separate Listing of Impairments for adults and children.  Further, the SSA evaluates children’s and adults’ functional limitations using different frameworks.  The main issue in an adult’s case is whether his or her disability is severe enough to prevent full-time work.  Obviously, since children do not work, Social Security cannot analyze a child’s functional limitations in this manner.  Instead, the SSA determines whether a child has “marked” limitations in at least two (or “extreme” limitations in at least one) of six areas of functioning Social Security calls “domains”: Acquiring and using information:  the child’s ability … Continued

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September 24, 2015

What happens to my child’s SSI benefits at age eighteen?

When a child turns eighteen, he or she becomes an adult under Social Security’s rules.  Therefore, if you are receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for your child, you should be prepared for Social Security to re-evaluate your child’s medical condition once he or she turns eighteen. The Social Security Administration uses different criteria for children and adults when determining disability.  First, Social Security has a separate Listing of Impairments for children and for adults.  While many of the listings are substantially similar, the specific criteria for many of the listed impairments are different for adults than for children. Additionally, Social Security evaluates functional limitations quite differently between adults and children.  For adults, Social Security determines the claimant’s “residual functional capacity;” that is, how much he or she is physically and mentally able to do in a work-like setting.  The evaluators determine how much the claimant can lift; how long he or she can sit, stand, and walk; and whether he or she has any difficulties dealing with the mental demands of work.  After determining a claimant’s residual functional capacity, Social Security determines whether a person with those abilities can work full time.  If not, the claimant is disabled. For children, on the other hand, functional limitations are assessed by whether the child has “marked” or “extreme” limitations in certain domains of functioning including acquiring and using information, attending and completing tasks, interacting and relating with others, moving about and manipulating objects, caring for himself, and health and physical well-being.  If a child is markedly impaired in two of those areas of functioning compared to other children his or her age, the child is disabled. Because the requirements change when a child becomes an adult, Social Security re-evaluates the child’s medical condition during the year prior to his or her eighteenth … Continued

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May 5, 2015

Asperger’s Syndrome and Obtaining Social Security Disability Benefits

Often, my blog topics reflect certain disabling conditions or Social Security disability issues that seem to be becoming more prevalent in my practice.  Asperger’s Syndrome is definitely one of these conditions; I represent many children and adults who have been given this diagnosis. Of course, the most recent DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which was released in May of 2013) no longer contains a diagnosis of “Asperger’s Syndrome”; the disorder, along with other disorders such Pervasive Development Disorder NOS, is now included under the diagnosis of “Autism Spectrum Disorder.”  As people with Asperger’s and their families know, it doesn’t matter what it’s called; the symptoms and limitations remain. People with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder typically have social communication and interaction deficits and restrictive, repetitive patterns of behavior.  These symptoms often interfere with an adult’s ability to work or with a child’s ability to function at an age-appropriate developmental level.  If you or your child have these symptoms, you could be eligible for benefits under Social Security’s Disability Insurance (SSDI) program or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. Whether you are an adult or a child on the autism spectrum, the first way the Social Security Administration (SSA) assesses whether your impairment is disabling under its rules is by referring to the entry for “autistic disorder and other pervasive developmental disorders” in its Listing of Impairments.  The relevant listing for adults is Listing 12.10; the relevant listing for children is Listing 112.10.  First, Social Security will determine whether you meet the diagnostic criteria for an autism spectrum diagnosis.  Next, it will evaluate how severely your symptoms affect your ability to function.  For adults, this means an adjudicator will determine how markedly your symptoms impair your activities of daily living, your social functioning, and your ability to maintain … Continued

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March 6, 2015

Common Questions Concerning Children’s SSI Claims

In my Social Security disability practice, I meet many parents of children with special needs.  They have heard that Social Security has a program for children with disabilities, but they do not know how to find out more about it.  Here are some answers to some of the most common questions I hear from parents of disabled children. How do I know if my child meets the requirements for SSI? Qualifying for SSI is a two-step process.  SSI, or Supplemental Security Income, is a needs-based program; therefore, your household must fall below a certain amount of income and resources to qualify at the first step.  Unfortunately, there is no hard-and-fast number that I can say, “If you make XX amount of money, you are over the limit” because Social Security’s formula is more complex than that – it depends on the size of your household, your expenses, and the like.  Similarly, there is a limit (currently $2,000 for a single person; $3,000 for a couple) on household resources (the value of the things you own), but there are exemptions for some things like your home and sometimes your vehicle.  Really, the only way you can definitely determine whether you meet the income and resources limits is to talk directly to Social Security. Once you qualify financially, Social Security determines whether your child meets the medical requirements.  This determination is much less black-and-white than the resources test.  They look at your child’s medical records and determine how her impairments limit her ability to function in six different “domains”: Acquiring and Using Information, Attending and Completing Tasks, Interacting and Relating with Others, Moving About and Manipulating Objects, Caring for Yourself, and Health and Physical Well-Being. Is it best to work with a lawyer in the process? In theory, Social Security’s process is … Continued

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August 8, 2014

Social Security Disability Benefits for Learning Disabilities

Many of the children I represent in claims for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) have been diagnosed with some type of learning disability.  While Social Security Administration (SSA)‘s Listing of Impairments does not specifically address learning disabilities, its evaluation process does consider the effects of learning disabilities on a child’s ability to function. Some of the children I represent have learning disabilities related to mental impairments such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (Listing 112.11), mood disorders (Listing 112.04), anxiety disorders (Listing 112.06), or intellectual disabilities (Listing 112.05).  Other children have learning disabilities that are less easy to categorize, so Social Security evaluates them differently.  Once Social Security determines that a child’s impairments do not medically meet or equal one of its Listings, it then evaluates the child’s combination of impairments to see if he or she “functionally equals the listings.”  If the child has marked impairments in acquiring and using information,  attending and completing tasks, interacting and relating to others, moving about and manipulating objects, caring for himself, or health and physical well-being, Social Security may find the child meets its definition of disability. In order to show Social Security that your child is disabled, you first must show that he or she has a medically determinable impairment.  Helpful evidence includes: Medical diagnoses and treatment notes Therapy/counseling notes Clinical test results Other medical findings Next, you must show how your child’s medically determinable impairments keep him or her from functioning at an age-appropriate level.  Evidence of these limitations includes: Individual Education Plans (IEPs) School grades Results of standardized testing Evaluations and treatment notes from occupational and physical therapy or other types of rehabilitation School or day care discipline reports Written comments from teachers regarding the child’s ability to work at grade level, complete assignments, work without supervision, and behave appropriately in a classroom environment … Continued

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January 3, 2014

Social Security Disability Benefits for Children with Disabilities

Social Security’s process for evaluating children with disabilities is a little different than its process for evaluating adults. However, building a successful case for either an adult or a child requires the same elements: a solid history of consistent medical treatment, strong evidence of difficulties in daily functioning, and lots of patience. Raising a disabled child can be expensive. Between medical treatment, prescriptions, and specialized education, footing all the bills can be difficult. You may be having difficulty holding a job because caring for your child causes you to miss a lot of work. If you have a disabled child and are struggling to pay bills, you may want to look into applying for disability for your child. Disabled children typically qualify for benefits under SSI (Supplemental Security Income). SSI is a needs-based program; Social Security will ask you about your household income and resources to determine whether you meet their financial guidelines. Once Social Security determines that a child’s household meets its financial criteria, it considers whether the child’s impairments meet Social Security’s definition of disability. A child may be found disabled due to physical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, or heart defects), mental conditions (such as ADHD, autism, Tourette’s syndrome, or depression), or a combination of physical and mental impairments. The Social Security Administration (SSA) will first look to see if you child’s disability meets a listing in its Listing of Impairments – Children. If your child does not meet the specific criteria of a listing, Social Security will then evaluate whether he or she “functionally equals the Listings.” To do so, the SSA looks at your child’s ability to function in six different domains. “Domains” are broad areas of functioning used to evaluate whether your child can function at an age-appropriate level in all aspects of … Continued

Filed under: Social Security Disability Benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) || Tagged under:
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September 27, 2012

Autism and Child Social Security Disability Benefits

One of the most rewarding parts of my job as a disability lawyer is helping disabled children and their families get the benefits they deserve.  After hearing about the daily struggles  families face when they have disabled children, it is hard not to take a personal interest in their cases.  I believe a larger percentage of my practice is made up of Supplemental Security Insurance (SSI) claims involving children than in the practices of many of my fellow Social Security disability attorneys.  In fact, sometimes other attorneys refer children’s cases to me because they simply do not handle children’s disability claims.  I have noticed that more and more of my child clients have been diagnosed on the autism spectrum, and I have found that many of these cases have unique issues that must be addressed in order to enhance the chances of a favorable outcome. The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses six “domains” of functioning to determine how a child’s daily living is affected by the child’s disability.  These domains are: Acquiring and using information Attending and completing tasks Interacting and relating with others Moving about and manipulating objects Caring for yourself Health and physical well-being. A child is considered disabled if the child either has “marked” limitations in two of these domains, or “extreme” limitations in one of them. I have found that many autistic children have extreme limitations in interacting and relating with others.  Individuals with autism may have difficulty holding simple conversations with others, suffer from language difficulties, or repeat words or phrases (echolalia).  I have noticed many of these children do not have the ability to recognize the simple social cues most of us take for granted.  In my experience, most of these kids are smart, and I mean really smart, but their inability to interact … Continued

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