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July 31, 2017

Can I Receive Social Security Disability for Bipolar Disorder?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes Bipolar Disorder as a disabling condition that can result in disability payments.  My clients often tell me Bipolar Disorder prevents them from getting and keeping a job.  While the symptoms may vary from person to person, I see many of my clients simply not having the ability to concentrate or focus long enough to maintain employment. The SSA acknowledges Bipolar Disorder in its Listing of Impairments under listing 12.04 Depressive, Bipolar, and Other Related Disorders.  If you meet or equal this listing, you may be eligible for benefits.  However, there also may be technical criteria that must be met.  Since there is no objective testing that can show the presence of Bipolar Disorder; hospitalizations, ongoing therapy records, and medication compliance may be the key to receiving benefits. In my Social Security Disability practice, one of the challenges to these cases can be consistent and ongoing therapy records, as the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder is not going to be enough.  The SSA generally wants to see a client-patient relationship documenting the ongoing mental illness and compliance with medications prescribed.  If the symptoms still exist after pursuing consistent treatment, then your claim may be given greater weight. A medical source statement from a treating mental health specialist can help the Social Security Administration and/or an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) determine your condition is severe enough to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Some health care professionals are unwilling to produce these types of documents, but it may be in your best interest to ask if they will take the time to do so.  In my experience, these statements should contain a clear diagnosis, how long the condition has lasted and is expected to last, the symptoms, and an opinion on … Continued

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August 19, 2016

If I Had a Stroke, Can I Receive Social Security Disability?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) can determine whether or not you can receive disability payments for the after-effects of a stroke.  While there are two separate disability programs, Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI), the medical requirements to receive payments are the same.  The mental and physical residuals from a stroke can make it difficult, if not impossible, to maintain full time employment. Your first step is to file an initial application.  Some individuals who have suffered a stroke may have difficulty even starting the application process due to difficulties with communication, memory, and typing or writing.  Get help from a friend or family member to start the application if you need to; Social Security recommends that you designate a “third party” whom they can contact if they need additional information.  The application process is designed by Social Security to be completed by an individual without the assistance of an attorney or representative.  However, I have helped many clients file an initial application because they preferred to have the help of someone familiar with the process.  For someone dealing with memory loss, difficulty speaking, and problems getting around, it can be helpful to have an attorney or representative take charge of the case to make sure everything gets submitted on time and to patiently assist with the completion of Social Security’s forms and questionnaires. How does the SSA evaluate individuals suffering from a stroke when determining disability?  First, they decide whether you “meet a listing.”  The SSA publishes a Listing of Impairments that details the information they consider for each specific condition.  Stroke is covered in the listing for neurological impairments under Section 11.04.  What happens if you do not meet or equal the listing for stroke?  Social Security then evaluates whether your residual functional capacity … Continued

Filed under: Indiana Social Security Disability Attorney, Qualifying Disabilities and Impairments, Residual Functional Capacity || Tagged under:
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April 15, 2013

Depression and Your Indiana Social Security Disability Hearing

I represent my Indiana neighbors in hundreds of disability hearings each year, and find the diagnosis of depression in the majority of them.  From my experience talking to these individuals, I understand how disabling depression can be and how it can prevent anyone from holding down a full-time job.  When the Social Security Administration (SSA) analyzes your claim, it must consider all of the impairments you have, both physical and mental, alone and in combination.  It is important, therefore, when you apply for benefits to let the SSA know about all of the problems that you have that affect your ability to work. One of my biggest challenges representing people with depression comes when I have a client who is receiving all of her mental health diagnoses and treatment from her family physician.  While your family doctor can make a diagnosis of depression and prescribe medications for it, she is not a mental health specialist.  One factor an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) considers when determining whether your depression is severe enough to keep you from being able to work is whether you are getting treatment from a specialist.  If you have heart problems, most judges expect you to receive treatment from a cardiologist; if you have back problems they want to see records from an orthopedist.  In the same way, if you have depression or another mental health impairment, most ALJs think that you should be receiving treatment from a psychiatrist and attending counseling with a psychologist, social worker, or other mental health professional.  Your chances of winning your claim may be greatly enhanced if you are seeing a psychiatrist and therapist on a regular basis. When I represent a client with depression, I try to obtain statements from his psychiatrist or therapist to submit to the ALJ.  A specialist … Continued

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December 11, 2012

Depression and Your Indiana Social Security Disability Appeal

Depression seems to rear its head in the majority of the claims I handle in front of the Social Security Administration (SSA).  While some of my clients suffer from depression alone others may suffer from depression due to their physical disabilities.  I am sure I am not alone when it comes to a large portion of my clients suffering from depression, in fact I am sure the Administrative Law Judges who preside over the hearings I attend routinely examine medical records with a diagnosis of depression.  With this being a common thread I experience, just how do you win your disability claim when trying to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI)? In my experience you need to take a long hard look at who you are getting psychological treatment from.  If you are receiving treatment from a general practitioner you may want to rethink your medical options.  The SSA usually wants you to be seeing someone who specializes in the disability you claim you have.  In other words, a psychiatrist, psychologist, or a mental health therapist may be your best option when trying to prove you have symptoms of depression that are preventing you from working.  A well documented course of ongoing therapy with detailed progress notes can go a long way in convincing a Judge you are disabled.  Hospitalizations for mental illness can also show you are not getting better in spite of treatment and following prescribed medications.  Sometimes I will sit in a hearing and listen to my client testify and think they are certainly clinically depressed by their testimony, but realize at the same time that their medical records are minimal and they have not been seeing a doctor that the SSA is going to recognize.  The truth is you can be … Continued

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September 9, 2011

Social Security Disability Attorney in Indianapolis and Disability Benefits for Affective Disorders

Indiana Social Security disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis is an experienced attorney who represents individuals with their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim. In his disability claims experience, he has represented individuals with a variety of disabling conditions.  Whether you suffer from a mental disorder or a physical disability, if you are unable to work due to this disabling condition or a combination of disabling conditions, you may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits. Attorney Scott D. Lewis often finds himself representing a disability claimant who suffers from an affective disorder.  An affective disorder is a disabling condition which is characterized by a disturbance of mood.  Mood is an emotion that generally involves depression or elation. In order to qualify for Social Security disability benefits for an affective disorder, an individual is required to suffer from an affective disorder considered severe.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) outlines the qualifying criteria in the “Listing of Impairments,” Section 12.04 Affective Disorder. In this listing, it states that a disability claimant must meet the criteria by proving that one of the following conditions is persistent (either continuous or intermittent): Depressive syndrome characterized by at least four (4) of the following:   a. Anhedonia or pervasive loss of interest in almost all activities; or b. Appetite disturbance with change in weight; or c. Sleep disturbance; or d. Psychomotor agitation or retardation; or e. Decreased energy; or f. Feelings of guilt or worthlessness; or g. Difficulty concentrating or thinking; or h. Thoughts of suicide; or i. Hallucinations, delusions, or paranoid thinking; or 2. Manic syndrome characterized by at least three of the following: a. Hyperactivity; or b. Pressure of speech; or c. Flight of ideas; or d. Inflated self-esteem; or e. Decreased need for sleep; or f. Easy distractibility; or g. Involvement in activities that have a high probability … Continued

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February 7, 2011

Social Security Disability Benefits for Claimants with Depression

Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyer Scott Lewis is an experienced attorney representing Social Security disability claimants.  Many of his Indiana Social Security disability clients suffer mental disorders such as depression.  Often, disability claimants with depression do not have sufficient medical documentation to back up their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim. Some disability claimants lack health insurance causing insufficient medical documentation.  Mr. Lewis advises his clients to investigate in the low income health programs or programs offered to uninsured individuals located in the Indianapolis area such as Wishard’s Health Advantage program.  Some other reasons disability claimants with depression may lack medical documentation supporting their claim is because a claimant may not be seeing doctors because they are ashamed of their disabling condition so they don’t seek the medical attention that they need from a mental health professional.  Having a lack of medical history to support your disability claim may ultimately cause you to lose your case. The Social Security Administration (SSA) approves SSDI or SSI claims based on medical evidence, so if you are suffering from depression, it is important to seek out the opinion of a qualified mental health professional such as a psychiatrist or psychologist who will provide documentation to back up your claim.  It may be helpful that these professionals need to identify that: you are indeed suffering from clinical depression; and your depression significantly interferes with your ability to work. If your mental health physician has prescribed you medication to help you with your depressive state, the SSA may frown upon your lack of compliance if you do continue to take your medications.  Medications such as anti-depressants may not enough to prove your case.  A psychiatrist can be most effective in helping you to demonstrate the following to the SSA: The individual is depressed and suffering from a history of mental health issues related to his/her … Continued

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