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October 26, 2017

Social Security Disability and Diabetes

In my Indianapolis, Indiana Social Security disability practice, I handle numerous cases involving Diabetes.  Since there can be so many varying degrees of severity with Diabetes, I try to find out how it affects each individual client regarding their ability to work.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes Diabetes as a disabling condition either by itself or combined with other severe impairments. Diabetes can occur when the body does not produce enough glucose due to a lack of insulin.  Medical treatment and dietary control can sometimes help to control Diabetes, but other times it does not.  Uncontrolled Diabetes can create a variety of symptoms and these can include but are not limited to: Neuropathy (Nerve damage in the feet and/or hands. This is by far the most common symptom I see in my practice.) Retinopathy (Vision impairment) Fatigue Nephropathy (Kidney disease) Extreme hunger and/or thirst Frequent urination Just having the above symptoms is not enough to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  They must be severe enough to meet or equal one of the SSA’s Listing of Impairments or prevent you from working a full-time job.  Most of my clients with Diabetes say that the neuropathy they experience makes them unable to work.  They complain of numbness and/or tingling in their hands and/or feet that prevents them from standing and walking or using their hands for fine and gross manipulation. As with all disability claims, medical documentation can be essential to a favorable outcome.  Compliance with medical treatment can show that even though you are taking prescribed medication (including insulin), your severe impairment still exists.  Objective testing such as nerve conduction studies for neuropathy and vision tests for retinopathy can go a long way in convincing an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) that you are … Continued

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March 30, 2015

Diabetes and Your Social Security Disability Claim

If you suffer from diabetes and your symptoms keep you from being able to work, you may be eligible for either Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. The prevalence of diabetes among my clients seems to be ever increasing.  Some of my clients suffer from Type I diabetes, which typically starts in childhood.  However, most of my clients with diabetes have Type II diabetes, or adult-onset diabetes.  Unfortunately, many of my clients have medical impairments that greatly increase their risk of developing diabetes, such as cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol.  Others develop risk factors such as obesity, poor diet, and physical inactivity due to the physical limitations caused by their other medical impairments.  If you suffer from diabetes, even if you do not consider it to be the most disabling condition you have, its effects on your ability to work may be substantial.  When talking to Social Security about your disabling conditions, it is always important to discuss all of your impairments, even if you don’t think a particular condition like diabetes would be disabling to you all by itself.  Social Security determines your limitations based on the combination of all of your functional limitations that result from any and all medically determinable impairments you have. While the Social Security Administration (SSA) addresses diabetes in Section 9.00 of its Listing of Impairments, diabetes is no longer a listed impairment.  (Social Security removed the listing for diabetes in 2011.)  Instead, Social Security notes that the effects of diabetes on different body systems might allow you to meet or equal other sections of the Listings.  In Social Security Ruling 14-2p, the SSA identifies some examples of the effects of diabetes, including: Diabetic neuropathy (evaluated under Listing 11.14 for peripheral neuropathies) Diabetic retinopathy (evaluated under … Continued

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March 4, 2014

Social Security Disability Benefits for Claimants with Diabetes

Diabetes (also known as diabetes mellitus) has two main types.  Type 1 DM (diabetes mellitus) comes from the body’s inability to produce insulin.  People with this condition typically have to inject themselves with insulin or wear an insulin pump.  Type 2 DM stems from the body’s resistance to insulin – that is, the body’s cells cannot properly use insulin.  Type 2 DM is also known as adult-onset diabetes. Some symptoms of diabetes may include: weight loss frequent urination increased thirst increased hunger skin rashes blurred vision These symptoms may onset in a matter of weeks after triggered (usually by certain infections from the environment) for type 1 patients as opposed to slowly or not at all for type 2 diabetes patients.  Type 1 diabetes is usually inherited, with certain infections bringing it out.  Type 2 diabetes is typically caused by lifestyle habits and genetics.  There is no known cure for diabetes. Diabetes can often be controlled with medicine and/or lifestyle changes.  Sometimes, though, in spite of the patient’s best efforts, symptoms persist.  For example, some medical conditions might prevent the patient from being able to tolerate necessary medication or endure an exercise program.  Consistent access to treatment and medication is another hurdle many patients face due to lack of insurance and financial resources. Diabetes can be a very debilitating condition, and it is possible to receive Social Security Disability benefits because of it.  There is not a specific listing for diabetes in the Social Security Administration’s Listing of Impairments, but diabetes is addressed  in Section 9.00 – Endocrine Disorders.  Simply having a diagnosis of diabetes is not enough to meet Social Security’s definition of disability.  Your diabetes must cause functional limitations that prevent you from performing work-like activities on a regular and continuing basis. Diabetes may cause some symptoms that … Continued

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November 11, 2012

Diabetes and Winning Your Social Security Disability Claim

Practicing Social Security Disability law in Indianapolis has opened my eyes to how many people suffer from diabetes.  Many of my clients suffer from several different disabling conditions at the same time, and more often than not, diabetes is on their list.  At your disability hearing in front of the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ),  the judge is required to consider all of your severe impairments when determining whether you are disabled.  Therefore, it is very important to let your attorney or representative know if diabetes contributes to your inability to work.  I talk to my clients extensively about how diabetes keeps them from working so I can better understand their limitations and present them to the judge. Diabetes mellitus (or simply diabetes) occurs when a person’s blood glucose level, commonly called “blood sugar,” is unacceptably high, usually due to poor insulin production in the body.  Diabetes is labelled as “type I” or “type II”.  The symptoms of diabetes can include: Frequent urination Numbness and tingling in the hands and feet Fatigue Blurred vision In my practice, the most common reason my diabetic clients find themselves unable to work is the tingling or burning known as neuropathy in their hands and feet.  They also suffer other symptoms that keep them from working when they are unable to control their diabetes with medication or insulin.  In my experience as a disability lawyer, the inability to stand and walk can greatly reduce the number and types of jobs a person can perform.  Many of my clients with neuropathy or swelling in their legs and feet cannot sit for very long without pain, and they are required to elevate their legs to relieve that pain.  These limitations reduce their “physical residual functional capacity” – the types of activities they are physically able to perform … Continued

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