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December 20, 2016

Digestive Problems and Social Security Disability

The impact of digestive problems can be very disabling. I have seen a large increase in the amount of these cases in my practice.  Whether it is due to better detection by physicians or an ever increasing amount of individuals suffering from these disorders, it is obvious these conditions can make a huge impact on a person’s life. While it may seem to you that the Social Security Administration (SSA) does not understand the difficulties you are experiencing, they do acknowledge these disorders in its Listing of Impairments. Listing 5.00 Digestive System-Adult may address a condition you are experiencing.  The Listing of Impairments is a guideline the SSA uses to establish criteria they acknowledge as disabling.  The SSA will usually not only send you to a consultative examination, but obtain and review your medical records from treating physicians to determine if you meet these guidelines.  Unfortunately, in my experience, many individuals are not found disabled on initial application and find themselves appealing their Social Security Disability (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim. The SSA should determine your Residual Functional Capacity (RFC). Your RFC is basically what your limitations are after your impairments are taken into account. I find many of my clients have symptoms such as, but not limited to: Diarrhea Constipation Abdominal pain Nausea Vomiting Bloating Bleeding Obviously, these are only a representative sample of symptoms. The severity of these symptoms vary greatly among my clients.   The SSA may find you disabled because of the severity of these symptoms. Your symptoms could cause you to be off task too often to compete in a work environment.  You may also have too many absences due to your health to maintain employment.  Digestive issues can create a number of problems that make you unable to work.   I represent … Continued

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May 2, 2013

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and obtaining Social Security Disability Benefits

In my Indianapolis disability practice, I see an increasing number of people suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and other digestive impairments.  One difficulty these clients experience when trying to convince the Social Security Administration (SSA) they are disabled is that they usually do not have any outward signs and symptoms.  I represent hundreds of clients with many different impairments, and a good number of them require a cane, a walker, or even an oxygen tank.  My clients with digestive issues, though, do not usually need any sort of assistive device.  That being said, after working with clients who deal with IBS and other digestive issues, it is clear to me that their impairments keep them from being able to work a full-time job.   Of course, it is always important to have good, solid, comprehensive medical records, including objective testing, doctor’s statements confirming your disabling condition, and clinical descriptions of the symptoms that prevent you from working. The SSA addresses digestive impairments in its Listing of Impairments under Listing 5.00: Digestive Disorders.  These listings cover gastrointestinal hemorrhaging, chronic liver disease and liver transplantation, inflammatory bowel disease, short bowel syndrome, and weight loss due to digestive disorders.  The listings contain specific symptoms and test results you must demonstrate to the SSA in order to be found disabled based on your medical records.  If you review this listing but find that you do not experience all of the requirements of a listing, it does not mean that you are not disabled under the SSA’s rules; it simply means that you will have to provide additional evidence to show that you are disabled.  For example, a medical expert may review your records and determine that even though you do not precisely meet every requirement of a listing, your symptoms are sufficiently similar to … Continued

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September 18, 2012

Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Social Security Disability

In my practice I often represent individuals with bowel and urinary problems, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is no exception.  The symptoms my clients describe make me a real believer that they are unable to function in a work environment without accommodations that most employers are unwilling to make.  Some of my clients find it embarrassing to discuss their symptoms, so they do not provide the best testimony at their disability hearing.  I remind them that their hearings are confidential, and that no one outside of the hearing room will know what has been said.  Nonetheless, I understand their hesitancy to discuss these personal issues. One key to winning at your Social Security disability hearing is to make sure that the administrative law judge (ALJ) understands the nature of your Irritable Bowel Syndrome symptoms.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) publishes a book called the “Listing of Impairments”  that attempts to clearly define the conditions the SSA recognizes as disabling. Although IBS is not specifically addressed in these listings, some of its symptoms are included under Listing 5.06 for Inflammatory Bowel Disease and under other listings in Section 5: Digestive System Impairments.  Even if your Irritable Bowel Syndrome does not meet or equal a listing under Section 5, your symptoms may be severe enough to interfere with your ability to do work-related activities.  These symptoms can include, but are not limited to: Diarrhea that can be frequent and chronic Constipation that can be frequent and chronic Abdominal pain Feeling of fullness or bloating Gas Many of my clients with this disabling condition complain of having to make countless trips to the bathroom each day and of having uncontrollable bowel movements or “accidents” on many occasions.  If you have frequent bowel accidents, it is important to inform your medical treating source about … Continued

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September 29, 2010

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Your Indiana Social Security Disability Claim

Indianapolis Social Security disability Attorney Scott Lewis often talks to potential clients about disabling conditions that are very difficult to live with. Irritable Bowel Syndrome or IBS can affect a Social Security disability claimant’s life in such a way as to make it impossible to maintain a full time job. For that reason, individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome may be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Irritable Bowel Syndrome may cause abdominal pain and cramping among other painful symptoms.  It can also be characterized by periods of loose stools and periods of constipation.  This painful condition can intrude on almost all aspects of a person’s life.  While there may be physical disabilities associated with IBS, there may also be mental disabilities including anxiety, stress, and even depression. How does the Social Security Administration (SSA) look at Irritable Bowel Syndrome?  The Social Security Administration recognizes Irritable Bowel Syndrome in its Listing of Impairments under Listing 5.06 Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).  What happens if your case of Irritable Bowel Syndrome does not precisely meet the listing?  You may still be able to win your Indiana Social Security disability claim or Indiana Social Security disability appeal.  If you can show Irritable Bowel Syndrome effects you in such a way that you cannot perform substantial gainful activity.  Your Irritable Bowel Syndrome may prevent you from working because you have to take unscheduled breaks.  Most employers are unable to tolerate a worker that cannot stay on task for certain periods of time. Indiana residents that suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome or IBS and are unable to perform work like activity because of this disabling condition may want to consult with a Social Security disability attorney to evaluate their claim.  Many disabilities such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome can be difficult to discuss, but it is important for Indiana and Indianapolis Social Security disability claimants to … Continued

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