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July 31, 2017

Can I Receive Social Security Disability for Bipolar Disorder?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes Bipolar Disorder as a disabling condition that can result in disability payments.  My clients often tell me Bipolar Disorder prevents them from getting and keeping a job.  While the symptoms may vary from person to person, I see many of my clients simply not having the ability to concentrate or focus long enough to maintain employment. The SSA acknowledges Bipolar Disorder in its Listing of Impairments under listing 12.04 Depressive, Bipolar, and Other Related Disorders.  If you meet or equal this listing, you may be eligible for benefits.  However, there also may be technical criteria that must be met.  Since there is no objective testing that can show the presence of Bipolar Disorder; hospitalizations, ongoing therapy records, and medication compliance may be the key to receiving benefits. In my Social Security Disability practice, one of the challenges to these cases can be consistent and ongoing therapy records, as the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder is not going to be enough.  The SSA generally wants to see a client-patient relationship documenting the ongoing mental illness and compliance with medications prescribed.  If the symptoms still exist after pursuing consistent treatment, then your claim may be given greater weight. A medical source statement from a treating mental health specialist can help the Social Security Administration and/or an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) determine your condition is severe enough to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Some health care professionals are unwilling to produce these types of documents, but it may be in your best interest to ask if they will take the time to do so.  In my experience, these statements should contain a clear diagnosis, how long the condition has lasted and is expected to last, the symptoms, and an opinion on … Continued

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January 6, 2016

Finding an Indiana Social Security Disability Lawyer for your Child

If you have had a difficult time finding an attorney to represent you in your child’s claim for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, you may not be alone.  When I speak to new clients in my Indianapolis Social Security disability law practice, they often tell me that many of the Social Security disability attorneys they had consulted simply do not take children’s cases.  Some Administrative Law Judges have told me that children’s SSI cases can be more difficult to win than adult cases.  In my experience, the chances of winning a child’s case are affected by the same factors that affect adults’ cases – we need good treatment records, statements from a treating physician supporting the claimant’s descriptions of his or her symptoms, and good preparation for the hearing.   I take great pride in helping the families of disabled children, and I believe my experience with these cases helps to ensure that my clients have the best chance possible at a favorable outcome. One of the reasons some attorneys may be reluctant to accept children’s cases is that the Social Security Administration (SSA) uses different criteria in evaluating a child’s disability that it does when it evaluates an adult’s impairments.  For example, Social Security has a separate Listing of Impairments for adults and children.  Further, the SSA evaluates children’s and adults’ functional limitations using different frameworks.  The main issue in an adult’s case is whether his or her disability is severe enough to prevent full-time work.  Obviously, since children do not work, Social Security cannot analyze a child’s functional limitations in this manner.  Instead, the SSA determines whether a child has “marked” limitations in at least two (or “extreme” limitations in at least one) of six areas of functioning Social Security calls “domains”: Acquiring and using information:  the child’s ability … Continued

Filed under: Evaluation Process, Indiana Social Security Disability Attorney, News, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) || Tagged under:
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September 16, 2013

Spinal Stenosis and Social Security Benefits

Many Indiana residents suffer from severe back problems that make it difficult if not impossible to work.  While back problems can vary, many individuals complain of back pain.  Back pain can result in an inability to stand, walk, and sit for certain periods of time.  If you have been denied disability benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA) and believe you are unable to work it may be wise to appeal that decision.  It is important to remember the majority of disability claims are denied by the SSA, and disabling conditions from your back are no exception. People suffering from Spinal Stenosis may experience pain so severe any chance of working an eight hour day would be very difficult.   In your spine there are spaces that may become narrow causing pressure on your spinal cord.  This can occur in any area of the spine. This may result in : Numbness Pain Difficulties in standing, walking, and sitting Weakness The need for the use of a cane or walker In my experience as an Indianapolis Social Security Disability Lawyer, I find it very important that my clients have appropriate objective medical testing to substantiate their claim for benefits.  A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) test may be the key to meeting or equaling the standards needed to win your claim.  I have found that comprehensive medical documentation from a qualified treating specialist can enhance your odds of proving you are unable to work.  Statements from your treating physicians may also be given weight that is necessary to prove your claim. For many people frustration may set in when going through this process. It is important, in my opinion, that you pursue your appeal if you believe you are unable to work.  Always remember there are time limits when filing a request for … Continued

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May 2, 2013

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and obtaining Social Security Disability Benefits

In my Indianapolis disability practice, I see an increasing number of people suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and other digestive impairments.  One difficulty these clients experience when trying to convince the Social Security Administration (SSA) they are disabled is that they usually do not have any outward signs and symptoms.  I represent hundreds of clients with many different impairments, and a good number of them require a cane, a walker, or even an oxygen tank.  My clients with digestive issues, though, do not usually need any sort of assistive device.  That being said, after working with clients who deal with IBS and other digestive issues, it is clear to me that their impairments keep them from being able to work a full-time job.   Of course, it is always important to have good, solid, comprehensive medical records, including objective testing, doctor’s statements confirming your disabling condition, and clinical descriptions of the symptoms that prevent you from working. The SSA addresses digestive impairments in its Listing of Impairments under Listing 5.00: Digestive Disorders.  These listings cover gastrointestinal hemorrhaging, chronic liver disease and liver transplantation, inflammatory bowel disease, short bowel syndrome, and weight loss due to digestive disorders.  The listings contain specific symptoms and test results you must demonstrate to the SSA in order to be found disabled based on your medical records.  If you review this listing but find that you do not experience all of the requirements of a listing, it does not mean that you are not disabled under the SSA’s rules; it simply means that you will have to provide additional evidence to show that you are disabled.  For example, a medical expert may review your records and determine that even though you do not precisely meet every requirement of a listing, your symptoms are sufficiently similar to … Continued

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April 25, 2013

Filing Your Initial Social Security Disability Application

I receive numerous telephone calls from my Indiana neighbors asking how to file an initial Social Security disability application. I typically recommend that they start the application process on their own, because most of the initial application involves providing information to the Social Security Administration (SSA) that only the claimant will know.  It is usually easier to provide that information directly to the SSA rather than to go through an intermediary. There are essentially three ways to file an initial claim: Visit your local Social Security office.  If you want to talk face to face with someone when you file your claim, this is your best option.  One advantage to applying in person is that you can get answers to any questions you may have, and having a Social Security employee assist you with your application should help to ensure you are providing all of the information the SSA wants.  On the other hand, if you go to the office without an appointment you may have to take a number and wait for a long time before finally being able to talk to a Social Security employee. Call the toll free number.  By calling 1-800-772-1213, you can talk to a Social Security employee who can answer your questions.  Most likely, the employee will make an appointment for you to either visit your local office or complete a telephone interview to start the application process. Visit the Social Security’s website at www.ssa.gov.  If you are comfortable using a computer, this is by far the most convenient option.  At Social Security’s website, you can complete your application online without having to make an appointment or spend time waiting at the local office.  The website takes you step by step through the application form and the Adult Disability Report.  Once you have completed all the steps, the website will instruct you to print some pages and mail them to … Continued

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