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February 23, 2017

Terminal Illness or TERI cases and Social Security Disability

One of the unfortunate realities of my job is that some of my clients are diagnosed as terminal. While being diagnosed with a terminal illness may seem like an obvious favorable decision for the Social Security Administration (SSA) to make, that may not always be the case. Even with this diagnosis the SSA may need more information and can be slow in making a determination.  Hopefully your medical provider, family, and Social Security attorney or representative can gather the information to make it easier for the SSA to make the right decision quickly.   The Social Security Administration avoids the words “terminal illness” and instead calls these cases TERI cases. The SSA defines a TERI case as “a medical condition that is untreatable and expected to result in death.”  Once this type of designation exists, the SSA attempts to expedite the case in the early and later stages of processing.  The SSA has guidelines for identifying these cases and processing them in a particular way.   Getting a medical source statement from your treating physician can be very important. Not only a statement saying the individual is terminal, but also supporting medical evidence establishing a clear diagnosis.  Objective testing and progress notes should be submitted to the SSA to show the severity of the condition.  Many physicians are hesitant to make such statements until all medical avenues have been exhausted.  If you find yourself in this situation it may be in your best interest to let your physician know you are dealing with the Social Security Administration.   If you or a family member finds themselves in this situation, I urge you to contact the SSA as soon as possible to start this process. Qualified Social Security disability attorneys and representatives can also provide guidance on filling out paperwork and … Continued

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January 31, 2017

Social Security Disability and the Durational Requirement

As a Social Security Disability Attorney, I see the Social Security Administration (SSA) turn people down for a variety of reasons. One of the common ways you may be turned down for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and/or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is because the SSA states you do not meet its Durational Requirement.  This is a fairly easy way for them to turn down your claim, but you can appeal this decision and many times find yourself with a favorable outcome in the long run.   What is the “Durational Requirement”? The language the SSA uses requires that you must have an impairment lasting or expected to last at least 12 months.  As you can tell, this can be a pretty subjective standard.  The SSA makes this determination on the current medical records they have on hand.  Unfortunately, your medical record may be incomplete when they make this determination.  You can appeal this decision and if you believe you are unable to work and will continue to be unable to work it is most likely in your best interest to file a Request for Reconsideration or Request for Hearing to move your case along.  You have approximately 60 days to file these appeals and it is very important to do so in a timely manner so you do not have to file another initial application.   It is also important to note your impairment must prevent you from performing Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) for at least 12 months in a row. What this essentially means is that you cannot receive disability benefits when your wages are over SGA.  This is a monetary amount establishing a cap you cannot go over.  Many of my clients have difficulty grasping this concept when they are holding down a full time job while … Continued

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August 31, 2015

Being Truthful at Your Social Security Disability Hearing

You may have heard about the guy who leaves his Social Security disability hearing in a wheelchair, throws the wheelchair in the trunk of his car, and walks easily down the street.  Is this an urban legend, or do things like this really happen?  As an Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney I have never seen someone fake an impairment like that at a hearing.  I have had clients ask me, though, whether they should use or wear their assistive devices at their hearing.  My answer is always the same: if the hearing is a situation in which you would normally use your assistive device, by all means use it at the hearing.  Otherwise, leave it at home. Your credibility with the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) at your hearing is very important.  In my experience, if the ALJ thinks you are untruthful about one thing, he may not believe anything else you say either.  Sometimes my clients are worried that the judge won’t be able to see how disabled they are if they don’t make a big deal out of their symptoms.  They go in to the hearing room acting as if it is the sickest day they have ever had.  Believe me, this type of behavior almost always give the ALJ the opposite impression – that the claimant is making things up.  For example, the judge may ask a claimant to rate her pain on a pain scale, where 0 is no pain at all, and 10 is pain so bad that she has to go to the hospital.  I have heard clients tell the judge that the pain they are experiencing during the hearing is a 10.  Obviously, they are not in the hospital; they are sitting in front of the ALJ at the hearing.  In my experience, it … Continued

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