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December 20, 2016

Digestive Problems and Social Security Disability

The impact of digestive problems can be very disabling. I have seen a large increase in the amount of these cases in my practice.  Whether it is due to better detection by physicians or an ever increasing amount of individuals suffering from these disorders, it is obvious these conditions can make a huge impact on a person’s life. While it may seem to you that the Social Security Administration (SSA) does not understand the difficulties you are experiencing, they do acknowledge these disorders in its Listing of Impairments. Listing 5.00 Digestive System-Adult may address a condition you are experiencing.  The Listing of Impairments is a guideline the SSA uses to establish criteria they acknowledge as disabling.  The SSA will usually not only send you to a consultative examination, but obtain and review your medical records from treating physicians to determine if you meet these guidelines.  Unfortunately, in my experience, many individuals are not found disabled on initial application and find themselves appealing their Social Security Disability (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim. The SSA should determine your Residual Functional Capacity (RFC). Your RFC is basically what your limitations are after your impairments are taken into account. I find many of my clients have symptoms such as, but not limited to: Diarrhea Constipation Abdominal pain Nausea Vomiting Bloating Bleeding Obviously, these are only a representative sample of symptoms. The severity of these symptoms vary greatly among my clients.   The SSA may find you disabled because of the severity of these symptoms. Your symptoms could cause you to be off task too often to compete in a work environment.  You may also have too many absences due to your health to maintain employment.  Digestive issues can create a number of problems that make you unable to work.   I represent … Continued

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December 5, 2016

Should I Be Nervous About My Social Security Disability Hearing?

Clients often tell me they are very nervous and anxious about their upcoming Social security Disability Insurance/Supplemental Security Income hearing. It is pretty easy to understand why.  Some people have never been to a hearing and others are so worried about the outcome they cannot even sleep the night before the hearing date.  Hopefully, this blog will shed a little light on what the atmosphere is at a Social Security disability hearing.   These hearings are considered informal. What that means is there are usually not any strict trial rules and the atmosphere is not that of a criminal or civil trial.  Many Administrative Law Judges (ALJ’s) will let you know that at the very beginning of the hearing.  Although I say it is informal, interrupting others may not be in your best interest and waiting your turn to answer questions may be advisable.  Most hearings have a predictable pattern and if you have an attorney or representative they can usually tell you what that pattern is.  I try to prepare my clients for each individual ALJ that will hear their case.  Different Judges think different things are important.  I believe it is helpful to make things easy for your Judge by being prepared and sticking to what they are interested in.  It would be a rare occasion that making a Judge angry would benefit you in any way.  Don’t get me wrong, all of your information needs to be presented, but as I said it should be done in a manner the court will respect and listen to.  In my experience, most hearings last around forty-five minutes to one hour.  Of course this can vary depending on the complexity of the case and each individual Judge.   Being nervous is normal and should be expected when the stakes are … Continued

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