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November 30, 2018

What You Can Do to Help Win Your Social Security Disability Case

We believe that the following simple steps may help enhance your claim:   File your paperwork in a timely manner. The Social Security Administration (SSA) requires you to meet certain deadlines.  You have 60 days (plus 5 days for mailing) to file a Request for Reconsideration after being denied on your initial application.  Failure to file this paperwork in a timely fashion may force you to start the process from the beginning unless you can prove you had good cause for your late filing.  If your Request for Reconsideration is denied, you again have 60 days (plus 5 days for mailing) to file a Request for Hearing.  Again, if you do not meet this deadline within the 60 days allowed, you may find yourself filing an initial application and starting the process from the beginning. Throughout the process, the SSA may ask you to complete a number of forms and reports that all have their own deadlines. Failure to do so can result in a denial.   See the appropriate types of physicians for your conditions and comply with treatment, if possible. Seeing the right kind of specialist specific to your disability can go a long way to prove to the SSA you are disabled.  The Social Security Administration follows specific rules regarding how to consider medical records or opinions, and your General Practitioner’s opinion alone may not provide enough weight to convince the SSA. More consideration is given to statements from a specialist such as statements relating to the severity of your condition, specific objective testing, and medical source statements as to your functional ability to work.  Our office welcomes all medical provider records that support your case. The more records we can get to support your claim, the stronger your claim becomes. We know that your medical insurance … Continued

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October 16, 2018

Learning Disabilities and Social Security Disability

Whether you are a child or an adult, the Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes learning disabilities as a condition that can pay Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments.  The severity of the condition and its impact on an individual’s functioning can be key factors in receiving benefits. In children’s Social Security disability claims, many aspects of the claim are examined.  These may include, but are not limited to: IQ testing Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) 504 Plans School grades Teacher questionnaires Medical Source Statements from treating physicians Progress notes from treating sources The Listing of Impairments is a guideline published by the SSA that contains specific information related to learning disabilities among other impairments.  The SSA also examines children’s cases under six domains of functioning to determine if a child is functionally equivalent to a listing.  The SSA will look for limitations in the child’s ability to acquire and use information, attend and complete tasks, interact socially, move and manipulate objects, handle their own self-care, or health and physical well-being.  Understanding a child’s Social Security Disability claim can be confusing, as the standard for disability can be different than that of an adult. Adults can also receive Social Security Disability benefits for a learning disability.  The question of whether you can work with a learning disability can be a little tricky to prove to an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ).  If you have worked in the past with your learning disability, the ALJ may wonder how it would currently prevent you from working if your condition has not gotten worse.  Sometimes, employers make “accommodations” for this type of worker.  This might be special treatment that the employer is unwilling to give to other workers.  This may include a job coach, multiple reminders of job duties, leaving work … Continued

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May 7, 2018

Medical Records and Social Security Disability

The importance of medical records to a Social Security disability claim cannot be understated. These documents are the primary source of evidence on which the Social Security Administration (SSA) will base its decision. Your medical records provide objective evidence of your disabling conditions and diagnoses. This may include key information such as notes from important procedures, like surgeries, or your doctor’s interpretation of test results and magnetic imaging. For mental health claims, session notes from a therapist or psychiatrist can show the SSA that you are receiving consistent and ongoing mental health treatment and reflect the severity of your condition. Therefore, it is critical that all of this documentation is made available to Social Security to ensure that they have a complete record before them when they make a decision on your disability claim. At the initial application and reconsideration stages, Social Security will gather your medical records based on the information you have provided them. You will want to make sure that whoever is reviewing your claim at these levels is kept up to date regarding the medical providers you have seen and the dates of any future appointments. If you have an attorney helping you at these levels, their office can work with your reviewer to ensure that they have all of the information needed to obtain any outstanding medical records. A complete medical file is especially important when preparing for a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ). The wait time to get to a hearing can be quite long, so it is essential to keep your attorney informed of any changes to your treatment, including any new procedures or diagnoses, which may occur during this time period. These updates allow your attorney to keep track of your treatment providers during the wait, which can help prevent … Continued

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January 29, 2018

A Few Quick Thoughts About Social Security Disability

I represent hundreds of clients every year in Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claims and there are things that I take for granted people know.  However, since they don’t do this every day, they simply do not.  In this blog I’ll share some things that I believe should be mentioned. Apply right away. What are you waiting for?  File an application the first day you are unable to work full time.  Sure, there may be technical and medical reasons why you do not qualify, but the application is free.  If you do not have an attorney to explain these medical and technical reasons to you, let the Social Security Administration (SSA) explain them.  I have seen clients wait too long to file an application and find themselves having a harder time because their disability insurance had expired.  Also, it is important to note that SSI payments can only be paid retroactively from your date of application. File your appeals timely! Most appeals only allow for 60 days plus a short grace period for mailing time.  You do not want to have to start over from the beginning, so get the Request for Reconsideration or Request for Hearing completed quickly. If you can afford it, see your doctors. Most Social Security disability cases are won through medical records.  Objective tests, progress notes, and physician statements can be crucial in proving you qualify for the benefits you need to support you and your family. When you go to your hearing, strive to ensure your medical record is up to date. If you do not have an attorney, do not count on the SSA to get your medical records.  Why would you?  Up to this point, they have continually denied your claim.  There is no one that has … Continued

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November 17, 2017

Can I Receive Social Security Disability for an Anxiety Disorder?

I represent many people with mental disorders, and anxiety is no exception.  This diagnosis can stand alone, or at times, it may be accompanied by other mental and physical disorders.  I have found that some of my clients’ symptoms from anxiety can be so severe that they are unable to interact with friends, family, or even leave their house to do routine activities.  With severe symptoms, the thought of dealing with the public, co-­­workers, and supervisors can be difficult, if not impossible.  In my experience, to win a Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim, essential information from a treating qualified mental health professional is generally needed. Anxiety can also cause problems with maintaining focus.  My clients often report issues with racing thoughts, trouble focusing, increased phobias, problems with change in routine, or difficulty sleeping at night.  Additionally, panic attacks can be a major issue for clients who suffer from anxiety.  These attacks can have varying degrees of frequency, duration, or severity; they can even lead to a need for emergency medical treatment.  Any of these symptoms can cause issues in the workplace that would prevent an individual from staying on task and completing a work day. By showing the Social Security Administration that you experience these symptoms through medical records or testimony, it can strengthen your claim for disability benefits. The Social Security Administration recognizes Anxiety Disorder in its Listing of Impairments under Listing 12.06.  At times, it can be difficult to meet or equal one of these listings, so it is important to receive treatment and have records from hospitalizations, treatment and progress notes, and any medical source statements your mental health professional can provide. Compliance with treatment can be a huge factor in receiving disability payments.  If you are not taking medications as … Continued

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September 6, 2017

Updating Your Social Security Disability Claim with Your Attorney

With the huge backlog of pending Social Security disability claims, you may think your case has been lost in a sea of paperwork.  My staff strives to let our clients know that just because they haven’t heard from us on recent progress with the Social Security Administration (SSA), we have not forgotten about them.  My staff spends much of the day updating cases and explaining the lengthy wait times to clients waiting to finally get their day in court.  It can be frustrating for clients, and contrary to what some may say, there is no preferential treatment given to a claimant because they hire a certain attorney. So what can you do during this long wait time?  Continue to see your doctors for necessary treatment as long as you can afford to.  Let your attorney know of any update to your medical condition, and if you do not have an attorney then let the SSA know about treatment. It is especially important to provide updates on any new treatment providers you have seen, as this will be particularly useful when it comes time to obtain medical records. Many things can happen while waiting for a hearing—your physical or mental condition may get better, get worse, or stay the same. Another important aspect of keeping your case updated is to let your attorney know if your contact information has changed.  During times of financial hardship, telephone numbers and addresses can change repeatedly.  When it comes time for your day in court, it is imperative that the SSA and/or your lawyer can contact you. We encourage our clients to contact us whenever they have a status update.  The appeals process goes through various stages.  Given the time limits for filing critical paperwork, keeping in contact with your attorney is essential.

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July 31, 2017

Can I Receive Social Security Disability for Bipolar Disorder?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes Bipolar Disorder as a disabling condition that can result in disability payments.  My clients often tell me Bipolar Disorder prevents them from getting and keeping a job.  While the symptoms may vary from person to person, I see many of my clients simply not having the ability to concentrate or focus long enough to maintain employment. The SSA acknowledges Bipolar Disorder in its Listing of Impairments under listing 12.04 Depressive, Bipolar, and Other Related Disorders.  If you meet or equal this listing, you may be eligible for benefits.  However, there also may be technical criteria that must be met.  Since there is no objective testing that can show the presence of Bipolar Disorder; hospitalizations, ongoing therapy records, and medication compliance may be the key to receiving benefits. In my Social Security Disability practice, one of the challenges to these cases can be consistent and ongoing therapy records, as the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder is not going to be enough.  The SSA generally wants to see a client-patient relationship documenting the ongoing mental illness and compliance with medications prescribed.  If the symptoms still exist after pursuing consistent treatment, then your claim may be given greater weight. A medical source statement from a treating mental health specialist can help the Social Security Administration and/or an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) determine your condition is severe enough to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Some health care professionals are unwilling to produce these types of documents, but it may be in your best interest to ask if they will take the time to do so.  In my experience, these statements should contain a clear diagnosis, how long the condition has lasted and is expected to last, the symptoms, and an opinion on … Continued

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May 21, 2015

Why Are Medical Records So Important to My Social Security Disability Claim?

Whenever I talk about the keys to a Social Security disability claim, I emphasize the importance of medical records.  Medical records are important because the Social Security Administration (SSA) cannot find you disabled under its rules without finding that you have a “medically determinable impairment.”  In other words, you must be able to provide acceptable medical evidence, such as objective test results or treatment notes showing diagnoses from acceptable medical sources, that proves that you have a medical condition that prevents you from being able to work. Why are Medical Records Important? While the SSA will most likely send you for an independent consultative examination to determine your diagnoses and symptoms, it is important to have medical records showing that you have been diagnosed and treated on your own.  I have often seen decisions in which an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) has concluded that a claimant’s impairment must not be as severe as he or she is alleging because the claimant did not receive significant medical treatment for it. Medical records are helpful in proving that you are disabled because they contain the diagnoses and clinical findings of medical providers who have treated you on a regular basis.  If those diagnoses and findings come from a doctor who specializes in treating your condition, Social Security will likely give them significant weight in determining whether your condition prevents you from working. What Kinds of Medical Records are Important? The most valuable records I can submit on behalf of my clients are objective test results.  X-rays, MRIs, nerve conduction studies, pulmonary function tests, and other tests give hard data showing the severity of certain conditions.  In fact, with appropriate test results it may be possible to show that you are disabled without even having to talk about whether you can perform work-like … Continued

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March 13, 2014

Bipolar Disorder and Social Security Disability Benefits

Bipolar disorder is a type of mental disorder.  It is usually distinguished by periods of depression that alternate with periods of “mania.”  Sometimes these episodes can be so severe that they impact a person’s ability to live a normal life.  There are five levels of moods associated with bipolar disorder: Severe Mania Hypomania Normal Mood Mild/Moderate Depression Severe Depression Some common signs that go along with these changing moods: Feeling more “high” than normal or very irritable Holding unreasonable beliefs about one’s own abilities Not sleeping much, but having a large amount of energy Talking so quickly that no one else can understand and experiencing racing thoughts Being very distracted or not being able to concentrate Acting very impulsively or recklessly In severe cases, experiencing delusions or hallucinations Bipolar disorder is not curable, but it can be manageable.  Management options may include psychotherapy or medication. The Social Security Administration (SSA) classifies bipolar disorder as an “affective disorder.”  According to the SSA, an affective disorder is “characterized by a disturbance of mood, accompanied by a full or partial manic or depressive syndrome. Mood refers to a prolonged emotion that colors the whole psychic life; it generally involves either depression or elation.”  Bipolar disorder is listed under Section 12.04 of the Listing of Impairments. When evaluating your Social Security disability case, Social Security will try to determine your “residual functional capacity” (RFC).  Your RFC is defined as your ability to do work-like activities in a work-like setting on a “regular and continuing” basis.  In other words, the SSA is trying to determine your ability to work a normal eight hour a day job. Even though bipolar disorder may not affect your ability to accomplish physical activities, such as standing, carrying, or using your hands, it does affect your ability to work in other ways.  For example, Social … Continued

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January 13, 2014

Medical Records and Being Prepared For Your Social Security Disability Hearing

In my practice as an Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney, I find that good communication is essential for me to provide the best possible representation for my clients.  My office takes pride in responding promptly and attentively to our clients’ calls, emails, and letters.  However, I am often surprised by clients who do not hold up their end of the deal!  My office mails several types of forms to our clients to help us collect the information we need to build a good case, and when clients do not return those forms promptly, it can really hurt our ability to prepare for their hearings. One of my office’s most important jobs in preparing for your hearing is submitting medical records that show the nature and extent of your disabilities.  We strive to work quickly and efficiently to request, follow up, and submit your medical records, but we cannot do any of those things unless you tell us where you have been receiving treatment.  As soon as we know when your hearing is scheduled, we will ask you to provide a complete list of your medical providers.  It can take weeks – sometimes over a month – for medical offices to process our requests for records, so if you wait to give us this information until a few days before your hearing, we probably won’t have all of your records submitted before the hearing is held. In my opinion, not having complete medical records available at your hearing will put you at a distinct disadvantage.  First, most of the Administrative Law Judges (ALJs) who decide Social Security disability appeals review the claimant’s file before the hearing.  The ALJ wants to know if you have been receiving consistent treatment, if you have been hospitalized for your condition, and if you have had any surgeries or other invasive treatments.  In short, the ALJ wants to make sure that your medical records provide objective evidence to support your … Continued

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