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November 25, 2016

Should I Bring a Cane To My Social Security Disability Hearing?

Many of my clients need an assistive device to get around more easily. The need for a cane, crutches, walker, or wheelchair may be necessary to walk even the shortest of distances.  Asking if you need to bring one of these items to your Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) hearing should not even be a question.  You either need this type of assistance or you do not.  The inability to ambulate effectively is necessary to fulfill a wide variety of jobs above the sedentary (Sitting) exertional level.  The need for such an item can erode the job base and can enhance your chances of winning your claim. Is it good enough just to go pick up a cane at the local pharmacy without a prescription or maybe borrow one from a relative? Many Administrative Law Judges (ALJ’s) will require you to have a prescription for an assistive device from your treating physician in order to recognize it as being medically necessary.  Many judges will not acknowledge the need for a cane without a physician stating it is necessary even though you may have been using it for years.  Documentation from treating sources can be key in a successful Social Security disability claim. Any medical source statements showing your inability to stand or walk for any extended duration may also convince the SSA that you are unable to perform certain types of occupations. As you age, and at the same time, have never engaged in or acquired transferable skills to a sitting occupation the SSA may find you disabled pertaining to medical vocational guidelines they use to make a finding of disability.  In Social Security’s world you inability to walk and stand can be a major factor in a finding of disability. In summary, this blog … Continued

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November 18, 2016

Do You Know Why You Are Disabled?

That seems like a strange question doesn’t it? My clients tell me they are disabled, but many have a hard time saying it in a way the Social Security Administration (SSA) understands. Many people have Social Security disability questions.  There can be many reasons why it is hard to explain your inability to work.  You may have a rare condition the SSA is not very familiar with; you may have a combination of impairments that, all added together, make you unable to work; you may have to argue you meet special rules the SSA recognizes; or you may just simply be unable to work a full time job.  Trust me, claiming you are disabled to the SSA can be confusing and difficult, or it can be as easy as they want to make it for you.  That’s why knowing what to tell them can possibly create a make or break situation.   In my experience, you need to be careful how you phrase things to the Social Security Administration. First of all, being disabled is not a joke.  Going to physical and mental examinations the SSA sends you to and taking it lightly may result in that particular examiner noting your attitude to the SSA.  All the way through the process, you need to express accurately to the SSA what you are experiencing.   Fill out the forms the SSA gives you truthfully and in their entirety. Some claims can be processed favorably without much human interaction by giving the SSA ALL of the information they request.  Be proactive in your claim, especially at the initial level, to ensure the SSA gets all pertinent information.  Unfortunately, after initial denials, while waiting for a hearing, your claim may not be looked at again until you find yourself in front of an Administrative Law … Continued

Filed under: Claims Process, Indiana Social Security Disability Attorney, Indiana Social Security Disability Client, News, Social Security Disability Attorney || Tagged under:
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