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September 1, 2011

Indiana Social Security Disability Benefits for Tinnitus

Indiana residents that experience tinnitus often wonder if they qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Depending on the severity of tinnitus, some individuals may qualify to receive disability benefits.  People with tinnitus may experience hearing a sound within their ear or head when there is no external physical sound present. Some individuals describe the sound as the following: hissing, chirping, buzzing, roaring, or high-pitched ring. Tinnitus is a very common problem that affects 10-17% of the general population. Approximately 44 million Americans experience tinnitus to some degree and is more prevalent in elderly people. Although some people find tinnitus is just a nuisance. Others may find it is a life-altering condition. My tinnitus is so severe that is causes me to be unable to work; do I qualify for Social Security disability benefits?  Many individuals find their tinnitus so severe that it interferes with their ability to function daily activities including, but not limited to, work.  These individuals may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits if he/she is able to prove the severity of the condition and how it affects their daily life.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) does mention under  their “Listing of Impairment” Section 2.00 Special Senses and Speech that tinnitus is part of vestibular disorders. At the law office of Scott D. Lewis, Indianapolis Social Security lawyer Scott Lewis has represented disability claimants with tinnitus.  In his experience, establishing and obtaining good medical records that support the claimant’s disability claim may be key to winning your disability claim.  Individuals with tinnitus may benefit by continuing to visit their treating physician and maintaining treatment as prescribed by their physician.  Tinnitus combined with other disabling conditions may be considered in your disability claim.  Attorney Scott D. Lewis offers a free consultation to individuals seeking disability benefits from the Social Security Administration.

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August 30, 2011

Weight-Bearing Joint Disability and Social Security Disability Benefits

Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis is an experienced disability attorney who represents Indiana individuals with their Social Security disability claims. Individuals who suffer from weight-bearing joint disabilities may find themselves unable to work due to this disabling condition.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes weight-bearing joint disorders in their “Listing of Impairments.”  The SSA’s “Listing of Impairments” is simply a list of impairments that the SSA uses to define and evaluate disability.  Under Section 1.00 Muscuskeletal System, you may find how the SSA evaluates weight-bearing joint conditions in order to qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Weight-bearing joints, also known as “load-bearing” joints, are located in the knees, hands, hips, feet, and spine. An individual may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits if he/she experience major dysfunction of a joint and the individual has one or more major weight-bearing joint issues causing the individual to have limited ability to walk, independently initiate, sustain, or complete activities. Individuals suffering from a weight-bearing joint disability may experience insufficient lower extremity function preventing him/her to have independent ambulation without the use of a hand-held assistive device(s).  Individuals that use hand-held assistance, such as a walker, two crutches or two canes, may find that they are limited with both of their upper body extremities. Therefore, not only having limitations with their lower extremities, but also limiting the use of their upper body extremities. According to the SSA, an individual who is able to ambulate effectively must be capable of sustaining a reasonable walking pace over a sufficient distance to be able to carry out activities of daily living. They must have the ability to travel without companion assistance to and from a place of employment or school. Some examples given by the SSA of ineffective ambulation may include, but are not limited to, the following: the inability to walk without the … Continued

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August 19, 2011

Indianapolis Social Security Disability Benefits Lawyers May Be Able to Give You A Good Idea Of What To Expect At Your Appeals Hearing

Indianapolis disability attorney Scott D. Lewis believes one of the most important aspects of his job is to advise his clients as to what they can expect during a Social Security disability hearing.  While Social Security Administrative Law Judges (ALJs) may have varying formats in the way they run the hearings, a general theme usually guides their line of questioning. Disability lawyer Scott Lewis finds the questioning generally falls into three categories and these include: General questions Job related questions Medical questions General questions most likely the easiest questions for the claimant to answer.  Questions concerning your name, address, age, marital status, number of children you have,  height, weight, right or left handed, and even the type of home you live in.  Why does the Social Security Administration care about these things?  Remember, the facts always matter.  If you testify you are unable to take care of yourself, but also testify you have three young children you care for, the Judge may not put as much weight into the testimony that you are unable to care of yourself.  Sound fair? Maybe not, but it is important to remember there is usually a legitimate reason for every question you are being asked. As for job related questions, usually the Social Security Administrations is only concerned with jobs you performed over the last fifteen years that lasted over three months.  Okay, so now you’re thinking, “I have had so many jobs that it’s going to be hard to remember one I performed fifteen years ago.”  Well, the judge at your hearing may have a printout of your past occupations and through a line of questioning can usually help you remember your past relevant employment.  Also, at some hearings a vocational expert or “job expert” may be present and possibly has already examined … Continued

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August 16, 2011

Digestive Disorders and Social Security Disability Claims

Many individuals suffering from a digestive disorder find that this disorder can take them away from work indefinitely. Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott D. Lewis assists individuals with digestive disorders with their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim.  The Social Security Administration’s (SSA) “Listing of Impairments” addresses the criteria for a variety of digestive system disorders in section 5.00 Digestive System.  Specifically, the following digestive orders can be found under this listing: 5.02 Gastroinntestinal hemorrhaging from any cause, requiring blood transfusion 5.05 Chronic Liver Disease 5.06 Imflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) 5.07 Short Bowel Sydrome (SBS) 5.08 Weight Loss due to any digestive disorder 5.09 Liver transplant Meeting the Listings for digestive disorders may be very difficult. However, individuals may also be awarded SSDI or SSI benefits if they suffer from a combination of health problems while they do not meet the listing, in combination prevent them from being able to perform substantial gainful employment. The “Listings of Impairments” are designed to award Social Security disability benefits to disability claimants who are clearly severely ill.  The Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) at a hearing can determine that a person, while not meeting a specific disability listing, has health problems severe enough to award the claimant disability benefits. Individuals suffering from a digestive disorder may experience the following symptoms or side effects: Development of allergies due to compromised immunity Abdominal pain Indigetion Heartburn Difficulty swallowing Diarhhea or constipation Chest pain Fatigue Bladder or bowel changes Unexplained weight loss Bloating and painful gas Nausea and vomiting Weakened immune system As stated above, being approved for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for a digestive disorder may be difficult. In order to successfully win your claim, it’s important to prove to the SSA what is wrong with you and how the digestive disorder negatively affects your daily life. In … Continued

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August 8, 2011

Heart Problems and Indiana Social Security Disability Benefits

Are you an Indiana disability claimant unable to work due to heart problems?  Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis represents those individuals with disabling conditions such as heart disease in their disability benefits claim.  Indianapolis disability claimants who suffer from heart conditions may qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits if he/she meets the Social Security Administration’s (SSA’s) Listing of Impairments.  In Listing 4.00 Cardiovascular System, the SSA outlines the requirements in order for an individual suffering from a heart condition to qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits. Heart disease, also known as cardiovascular disease, describes a large spectrum of disorders that affect the heart muscle and/or blood vessels. The primary cause of death, in men and women worldwide, is problems with the heart and blood vessels. Coronary artery disease (or atherosclerosis) is the result of plaque building up in the arteries.  This condition can lead to a heart attack, heart failure, high blood pressure, angina, and/or stroke. Congenital heart disease, heart infection, heart valve disease, and cardiomyopathy are examples of heart problems not related to arterial build-up. Strokes and heart attacks can cause serious physical limitations and are one of the most common causes of disability today. Damage to the heart or blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients throughout the body can cause any number of debilitating symptoms, including: Arrhythmia Chest Pain and Pressure Muscle Weakness Stomach Pain Fatigue Nausea and Vomiting Lightheadedness/Fainting Dizziness Anxiety Blood Clots Shortness of Breath Upper Body Pain Sweating Heart Palpitations/Rapid Heart Rate Heart and blood vessel problems result from damage done to the cardiovascular system, either through congenital defects or lifestyle and environmental factors. Pressure build-up in the arteries due to the presence of plaque restricts the blood flow to bodily organs and tissues. Plaque build-up … Continued

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August 4, 2011

Social Security Disability Benefits for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Indianapolis disability attorney Scott D. Lewis represents individuals with a variety of mental and/or physical disabling conditions.  Included in these impairments is those suffering with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).  Indiana residents with OCD may find themselves qualifying for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  OCD is a disabling condition that may qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits under the Social Security Administrations “Listing of Impairments,” Section 12.00 Mental Disorder.  OCD is specifically identified under section 12.06 Anxiety-related disorders.  Refer to the SSA’s website for criteria requirements.  What is Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?  OCD is a mental disorder when an individual worries, doubts or superstitious beliefs become excessive.  OCD is a condition in which the brain cannot let go of a certain thought, and therefore, it makes the patient overly anxious or worried about even the most menial aspects of daily life.  OCD sufferers have difficulty in controlling his or her worries, anxieties, or urges. Many times patients with OCD do not recognize the severity of their condition until it is either too late to treat, deal with the condition as a minor inconvenience, and in many case simply don’t realize what is happening. Unfortunately, OCD may impair a person’s ability to concentrate or communicate with others. As a result, OCD may prevent an individual from being able to work at a reasonable level. Some examples of OCD behavior may include, but is not limited to the following: washing your hands for hours at a time to make sure they remove all germs driving around the block over and over again to make sure an accident didn’t happen turning on and off lights for long periods of time to ensure the lights are turned off Since patients with OCD may either be obsessive and/or compulsive, it is imperative to understand difference. An ‘obsessive’ individual may think about germs too often, or … Continued

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August 1, 2011

Indianapolis Social Security Disability Benefits Due to Amputation

Indiana disability claimants with an amputation filing for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits may be surprised to learn that winning your disability claim based on amputation may not always be easy.  Amputation is defined as the complete severance of an individual’s extremety such as a hand, foot, arm or leg.  Amputation can be due to a medical removal, an injury, or some other form of trauma. Symptoms associated with having an amputated limb vary depending on which body part(s) has been amputated. Amputations of the feet or legs typically affect a person’s ability to walk, bend, climb stairs, and ability to move around. Amputations involving hands and arms typically affect a person’s ability to push, pull, or perform fine motor functions. Although activities for an amputee may be impossible or very difficult, many individuals experience pain around the area of the amputated limb.  Some common medical reasons for amputation may include: Diabetes Gangrene Severe Frostbite Hardened or Embolism of the arteries Raynaud’s disease Buerger’s disease How does an amputee qualify for SSDI or SSI benefits?  As stated above, just being an amputee does not automatically qualify an individual for disability benefits.  As all qualifying disabilities or conditions, in order to qualify for disability benefits for an amputated limb or extremity, an Indiana disability claimant must show that the amputation causes the person to be unable to perform functions that are important in the work place such as lifting, bending, walking, grasping, pushing, and pulling. The difficulty in showing this varies depending on which limbs have been amputated and the type of work (heavy, moderate, light, sedentary) that you have done before or could be expected to perform based on your age, education level and experience. Specifically, the Social Security Administration (SSA) defines the criteria for an individual to qualify for disability benefits because of an amputation in their “Listing of Impairments.”  … Continued

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July 26, 2011

Why Did I Get Denied My Social Security Disability Benefits When the Guy Down the Street Got Them Right Away?

If you only knew how many times Indianapolis Social Security disability lawyers like Scott Lewis have heard this very question. There are many different aspects to a Social Security disability claim and no one case is exactly like another one. While there may not be a clear cut answer to why some Indiana residents find a Social Security disability check in their hands before another person, in Indiana disability attorney Scott Lewis’ experience, there may be a few reasons this can happen and it can include, but is not limited to: Good medical records.  Comprehensive medical records outlining and detailing a disabling medical condition may be the key to a quick favorable outcome in a Social Security disability claim. Prior work experience, age, and education.  In the Social Security Administration’s approval process they determine your ability to work with your disabling condition while looking at age, education, and prior work experience. All disabilities are different and can create different barriers to employment.  While some disabilities may be visually evident, other disabilities like mental disorders may not be visible to the naked eye. The guy down the street may be luckier than you.  That’s right, he may have been evaluated by someone in the Social Security Administration that was more lenient on granting disability claims.  Believe it or not, actual people look at your claim and make a determination. The above are the thoughts and experiences of Scott D. Lewis, and other Social Security disability attorneys or representatives may have different experiences with the Social Security Administration (SSA).  If you have been denied your Indiana Social Security disability benefits and believe it was an unfair decision, contact attorney Scott Lewis for a free case evaluation.

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July 18, 2011

Aneurysm and Social Security Disability Benefits

If you have suffered an aneurysm you may be entitled to Social Security disability benefits. Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney Scott D. Lewis advises clients to go forward with their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claim if they are unable to work due to the after effects of an aneurysm. An aneurysm is an inflated blood-filled part of an artery that essentially exists due to a weak portion of the artery wall.  Some of the more common places that can cause severe problems and even death include the heart, brain, and the stomach among other areas of the body. Aneurysm of the aorta or major branches is a qualifying condition for Social Security disability benefits and is listed under section 4.10 in the Listing of Impairments.  For more information relating to the criteria needed to meet or equal this listing one should refer to Social Security’s “blue book”. A ruptured brain aneurysm may result in symptoms including double vision, speech problems, and cognitive issues.  The inability to maintain concentration for a specified amount of time may be enough for an individual to be successful in a Social Security disability claim. If you have suffered an aneurysm and the after effects are preventing work like activity you may be entitled to Social Security disability benefits.  If you have questions concerning your disability benefits you may want to contact the Social Security Administration or an attorney/claimant representative.  Most attorney’s or claimants representatives offer a free case evaluation.

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July 15, 2011

Are Indianapolis Social Security Disability Hearing Wait Times Shrinking?

Indiana Social Security lawyer Scott Lewis has noticed a few changes concerning the waiting period for getting your Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) hearing.  Have the wait times for Social Security disability hearings been reduced?  Mr. Lewis is not so sure there is a clear cut answer to this question. The Indianapolis Indiana Social Security disability hearing office has been attempting to get the number of days you have to wait for your hearing down to a manageable number.  The use of video hearings with Administrative Law Judge’s (ALJ’s) from other states presiding over the hearings held at the local Indianapolis office has seemed to make a dent in this huge backlog at times.  Although it is surprising to find an Indiana Social Security disability claimant to be at a video hearing within 12 months of their date of application, while in the next video hearing room an individual has waited for 30 months, there seems to be little explanation for why this discrepancy exists.  This can make it very difficult for Mr. Lewis to give his clients a good idea of when they might find themselves at the hearing office. There have been reports that while the Social Security Administration is taking measures to reduce the backlog, it is actually growing.  If this is indeed the case, the Social Security Administration may need to hire even more Administrative Law Judges and open more hearing offices.  Perhaps more concentration on finding individuals disabled in the earlier stages of the application process could be an answer.  Mr. Lewis knows one thing for sure: the individuals suffering the most from a hearing backlog are those disabled claimants who are unable to provide for themselves and their families. If you have questions concerning your Social Security disability claim … Continued

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