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January 7, 2011

The Social Security Administration and An Unsuccessful Work Attempt

You want to work and you know even with Social Security disability benefits you are going to struggle to make ends meet.  Even with all of the extreme pain you are experiencing, you finally find a job and drag yourself to it just to find out there is no way you can work.  You realize you cannot make it through a full day of work, and even if you do, you find yourself out of work for two days because of the pain you are in from forcing yourself to work.  Indianapolis disability lawyer Scott Lewis has heard the above scenario on numerous occasions.  If this has happened to you or a loved one this might be considered by the Social Security Administration as an “unsuccessful work attempt” or UWA. What is an Unsuccessful Work Attempt (UWA)?  This is where a person attempts to do substantial work, but stops or reduces the work to below Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) levels after six months or less because of a disabling condition or because of removal of special conditions related to the disabling condition. Other issues concerning an Unsuccessful Work Attempt that may have an impact can include whether you are receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), trial work periods, and extended periods of eligibility.  More information concerning these topics and other useful topics can be found in the Social Security Administration’s publication “The Red Book”. The good news is you do not have to tackle unanswered questions alone. Indianapolis Social Security attorney Scott D. Lewis strives to answer many questions concerning eligibility for Indiana Social Security disability benefits.  Indiana disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis talks to potential clients about claims involving bipolar disorder, scoliosis, stroke, epilepsy, depression, and many other severe impairments.

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December 12, 2010

Indiana Social Security Lawyer Scott Lewis Answers Questions About Returning To Work During The Claims Process

Indianapolis disability attorney Scott Lewis fields occasional telephone calls from his Indiana disability clients asking what the ramifications will be if they try to reenter the workforce.  As fundamental as it may sound, the facts of a particular case always matter.  Many Indiana residents are finding they are having a difficult time putting food on the table for themselves and their families during a very lengthy application and appeals process.  A few topics Indianapolis disability attorney Scott D. Lewis may encounter may include: Are you considering a full time or part time job?  If your disabling condition(s) do not permit you to work full time, but you think you may be able to work part time, you may be interested in a term call “Substantial Gainful Activity” or “SGA”.  This is an amount the Social Security Administration determines as earnings you can make on a monthly basis and still be entitled to disability benefits.  SGA for 2010 is $1,640.00/month for statutorily blind individuals and $1,000.00/month for non-blind individuals.  There are different criteria for those receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) concerning blind individuals. It appears these amounts will also be valid for 2011, but more information concerning SGA can be found on the Social Security Administration’s website. Should you withdraw your claim for either Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits as soon as you start back to work?  Indianapolis disability lawyer Scott D. Lewis usually advises his clients to wait and see if they are actually able to perform a full-time job or a job that creates more than the SGA for a number of months before withdrawing their claim. Many times, individuals believe they can work but find their condition prevents them from performing substantial gainful activity. If you have been waiting for an Indiana Social Security … Continued

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September 23, 2010

If I Try to Work, Will My Social Security Disability Benefits Stop?

Many hard working Indiana residents struggle to accept the fact they are no longer able to work to support their families due to a disabling condition. Depending on your disability working part time or eventually returning to the work force full time may not be out of the question. There are a few things to consider, such as how much money you can make and what programs the Social Security Administration (SSA) offers to get you back in the workforce. The first thing a Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipient may want to consider is how much money they can make working without jeopardizing their Social Security disability benefits.  This is called the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) Amount.  This is a monthly amount an individual cannot exceed after subtracting impairment related work expenses.  SGA is a higher limit for statutorily blind individuals.  In 2010, the monthly dollar amount is $1,640 for statutorily blind individuals and $1,000 for other disabled individuals. A program of interest for Social Security disability recipients wanting to re-enter the workforce is the Trial Work Period.  In this scenario, a person may try to re-enter the workforce and still have earnings and continue to collect Social Security disability benefits. There are rules covering the Trial Work Period in the link provided above.  Indianapolis Social Security Attorney Scott Lewis receives calls on a weekly basis asking what the provisions are for earning money while collecting Social Security disability benefits and routinely steers these questions for more specific information to the Social Security Administration’s website.

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