May 6, 2011

Will I Win My Indiana Disability Appeal Hearing If I Cannot Read Or Write?

Scott Lewis is an Indianapolis Social Security disability attorney who gets asked many questions regarding what qualifies a person for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  Every so often he speaks with a client who is unable to read or write and is struggling to find employment.  These individuals are sometimes surprised to learn the Social Security Administration (SSA) may believe there are numerous jobs in the economy that do not require a person to have the ability to read or write.  Does that mean you will be denied your Indiana Social Security disability benefits if you are unable to read and write?  Not always, there may be other factors that come into play when deciding if you are disabled.

Many Indiana residents that are unable to read and write have had difficulties obtaining an education.  This can be due to a variety of factors including having learning disabilities.  If you have had standardized intelligence testing (commonly known as IQ testing) and if your scores fall below a certain number you may be eligible for Social Security disability benefits.  You may find the criteria for this can be different for children than adults.  For more information you can look to Social Security’s “Listing of Impairments” under listing 112.05 for children and listing 12.05 for adults.

A Vocational Expert (also know as a Job Expert) may testify at an Indiana Social Security disability hearing that some individuals with a very low mental capacity may be unable to perform even simple routine repetitive tasks.  This could be due to the fact that they cannot remember simple directions and would need reminded of the work process too often by a supervisor to maintain employment. Also, if an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) decides a person may need a job coach to maintain employment, this may be the key for an individual to find themselves with a favorable ruling at the conclusion of a Social Security disability hearing.

Occasionally, disability appeals attorney Scott Lewis finds individuals, especially children, may be overlooked and denied Indiana disability benefits when it comes to learning disabilities.  If you are an adult or child that believes your inability to read, write, understand, and follow simple instructions create an obstacle to finding and keeping a job or preclude you from being able to perform age appropriate activities as a child you may be eligible for disability benefits.

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