November 12, 2009

What does the Social Security Administration (SSA) mean when they refer to a “Durational Requirement?”

hourglass.JPGMany Indiana residents attempting to receiveSocial Security disability benefits are confused about what the Social Security Administration (SSA) calls a “durational requirement“. 

A durational requirement refers to a time qualification that must be met in order to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.  A claimant’s disability must be expected to result in death or be expected to last twelve consecutive months or longer to qualify for benefits. 

Indiana residents should not confuse the durational requirement with how long they must wait in order to file a Social Security Disability claim. You should file a claim immediately when you become disabled.   Some people are concerned that they will need to wait 12 months before the SSA will find them disabled.  On the contrary, you may be found disabled if your condition is expected to last for 12 months or longer.  If there is a question of duration, it might be advisable for a claimant to get a medical statement that their condition is disabling and that it is expected to last at least 12 months and furnish this information to the SSA.

So remember, while you may presently be disabled, the SSA concentrated on this durational requirement as one of the factors to determine your ability to receive Social Security disability benefits. 

Indianapolis Social Security Disability Attorney Scott D. Lewis can assist your with your claim.  For a free consultation, call Scott at (317) 423-8888 immediately.

Filed under:Qualifying Disabilities and Impairments
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